NAD T758 V3 A/V Receiver Review Test Bench

Test Bench

Two channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 100.6 watts
1% distortion at 113.6 watts

Five channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 86.0 watts
1% distortion at 95.3 watts

Seven channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 66.3 watts
1% distortion at 77.8 watts

Analog frequency response in Bypass mode:
–0.16 dB at 10 Hz
–0.05 dB at 20 Hz
+0.13 dB at 20 kHz
–2.73 dB at 50 kHz.

Analog frequency response with signal processing:
–2.74 dB at 10 Hz
–0.92 dB at 20 Hz
–1.22 dB at 20 kHz
–67.51 dB at 50 kHz.

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This graph shows that the T758v3’s left channel, from Audio1 input to speaker output with two channels driving 8-ohm loads, reaches 0.1% distortion at 100.6 watts and 1% distortion at 113.6 watts. Into 4 ohms, the amplifier reaches 0.1% distortion at 139.9 watts and 1% distortion at 164.3 watts.

Response from the multichannel input to the speaker output measures –0.18 dB at 10 Hz, –0.05 dB at 20 Hz, +0.00 dB at 20 kHz, and –2.95 dB at 50 kHz. THD+N from the Audio1 input to the speaker output was less than 0.094% at 1 kHz when driving 2.83 volts into an 8-ohm load. Crosstalk at 1 kHz driving 2.83 volts into an 8-ohm load was –83.27 dB left to right and –84.88 dB right to left. The signal-to-noise ratio with an 8-ohm load from 10 Hz to 24 kHz with “A” weighting was –93.81 dBrA.

From the Dolby Digital input to the loudspeaker output, the left channel measures –0.42 dB at 20 Hz and –0.70 dB at 20 kHz. The center channel measures –0.39 dB at 20 Hz and –0.73 dB at 20 kHz, and the left surround channel measures –0.40 dB at 20 Hz and –0.83 dB at 20 kHz. From the Dolby Digital input to the line-level output, the LFE channel is –0.37 dB at 20 Hz when referenced to the level at 40 Hz and reaches the upper 3-dB down point at 118 Hz and the upper 6-dB down point at 121 Hz.—MJP

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COMMENTS
Ovation123's picture

I’m very interested in Dirac Live and would be willing to forgo many bells and whistles to have it. However, while I suppose I could live with a splitter box for my TV and projector—only 3 inputs is a deal breaker. I have an AppleTV, an Oppo BDP-83 for SACD/DVD-A/CD, a region-free 3D Sony Blu-ray, an A2 HD DVD player (with 100+ titles), a PVR and, occasionally, a PS3 hooked up for my kids’ (rare) video game parties in the HT room.

Even with Dirac, the price point with so limited an input layout is not justified. Oh well, perhaps V4 will be more generous with I/O.

utopianemo's picture

This is more for Rob: I had always assumed they were called “receivers” because they were the hub that ‘received’ signals from various sources. You’ve corrected my notion a few times in the past year or two, but I think “receiver” still accurately describes what they do.

utopianemo's picture

More to the point of the review, what would this upgrade cost if one already owned the shell? This seems like an appealing way to go.....as long as there is some sort of savings over the cost of the whole unit.

Philt56's picture

You say not yet, but has NAD committed to adding it in a future firmware update? I have a 787 and considering get the 4k vm300 card but not if Dolby vision is committed as a future fix.

hk2000's picture

If you look at the measurements of this receiver and the Sony STR-DN1080, they are almost identical, except the Sony is incrementally better in every measured respect, so Why is this getting 5 stars? And where does NAD get the "Great power section" reputation? If I were considering this, I'd take the Sony with the extra fatures instead and save the $800 bucks.

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