Throwback Thursday

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Laurence Greenhill  |  May 17, 2018  |  9 comments
The results of blind listening tests with eleven audio experts.

Editor's Note, 2018: In the early 1980s, esoteric high-end audio as we know it today was just taking off as an alternative to the mass-market equipment offered in neighborhood TV/appliance stores. Fueled by an underground audio press that included magazines and newsletters such as Sound & Vision sister publication Stereophile, The Absolute Sound, International Audio Review, The Audio Critic, and others, a cottage industry emerged, one populated by small manufacturers of low-volume, high-priced exotica claiming greater faithfulness to the music than the gear reviewed and advertised in the pages of Stereo Review, High Fidelity, Audio, et al.

Rob Sabin  |  Apr 26, 2018  |  4 comments
Julian Hirsch’s review of the Bose 901 in 1968 helped set off one of the greatest and longest-lasting audiophile debates.

There may be no singular product in modern audio history that has generated more accolades, derision, or pure controversy than the Bose 901 loudspeaker. Introduced in 1968 by a then four-year-old concern named after its MIT-educated founder, the 901 neither looked, nor sounded, like any speaker that had come before it. With its pentagonal cabinet that faced eight of its nine identical 4-inch, full-range drivers at the reflecting wall behind the speaker, its designer Amar Bose sought to have it mimic the way we hear in concert halls and imbue its sound with a giant soundstage and spatial realism that was unsurpassed.

Stewart Wolpin  |  Apr 05, 2018  |  2 comments
Our modern AV world arguably all stems from a single product: the Ampex 200A, the first successful commercial magnetic audiotape recorder, which debuted 70 years ago this month.
Rob Sabin  |  Mar 29, 2018  |  3 comments
For decades, the cartoons of Charles Rodrigues poked fun at us and the hobby we otherwise take all too seriously.

In the very first issue of HiFi & Music Review in 1958, the magazine that became Stereo Review and then Sound & Vision, a gifted 31-year-old artist named Charles Rodrigues contributed the first in a string of cartoons that both celebrated, and made fun of, that odd bird known as the audiophile. It ended up being a long run that lasted more than 40 years.

Michael Antonoff  |  Mar 15, 2018  |  1 comments
When Netflix launched its DVD-by-mail service 20 years ago, the dozens of websites selling DVDs said the newcomer would never survive. Funny how almost all of those competitors are now long gone.
SV Staff  |  Mar 08, 2018  |  0 comments
Nineteen years ago this week, the second issue of Stereo Review’s Sound & Vision hit newsstands. Stunning cover (and content) notwithstanding, the 152-page second act of the magazine that replaced Stereo Review (which enjoyed a prosperous 40-year run) and Video (which was the videophile’s go-to magazine for 21 years) was met with much praise…but not everyone was happy.
SV Staff  |  Mar 01, 2018  |  0 comments
Sixty-four years ago this week, Westinghouse unveiled the world’s first color TV in 60 stores throughout New York. The Westinghouse H840CK15 had a tiny 15-inch screen and sold for $1,295 — the equivalent of almost 12 grand in 2018 dollars!
SV Staff  |  Feb 22, 2018  |  4 comments
Ten years ago this week, a protracted format war between the Sony’s Blu-ray format and the Toshiba-backed HD DVD format, each vying to be the anointed successor to DVD, was averted when Toshiba announced that it would stop making HD DVD players, even though close to a million players had been sold and more than 400 HD DVD titles had been released in the U.S.
Robert Cobb  |  Feb 01, 2018  |  5 comments
In celebration of our 60th anniversary, Sound & Vision will be peeking back throughout this year at our past six decades of coverage. Given our long tenure, our editorial predecessors have reported on most of the seminal inventions in the history of consumer audio and video technology and have offered up shopping advice, which, to varying degrees, can be viewed today as either timeless or charmingly outdated. As much as possible, we will reproduce articles and reviews as they appeared, with the unedited text mated alongside the original illustrations.
SV Staff  |  Jan 18, 2018  |  1 comments
Forty-five years ago this week, the King, donning his iconic white sequin-studded jump suit, made history in Honolulu when more than a billion viewers in 40 countries tuned into Aloha from Hawaii Via Satellite, a live broadcast seen by the largest audience in the history of television.
SV Staff  |  Nov 30, 2017  |  0 comments
Pong, one of the earliest arcade video games, had an inauspicious start 45 years ago this week when gaming pioneer/Atari co-founder Nolan Bushnell and game designer Allan Alcorn wheeled a prototype of their first coin-operated game machine into Andy Capp’s Tavern in Sunnyvale, California to see how the bar’s patrons would react. It was an instant hit.
SV Staff  |  Nov 16, 2017  |  1 comments
Forty years ago today Steven Spielberg’s sci-fi masterpiece Close Encounters of the Third Kind, a tale about UFOs and the ultimate alien encounter, opened in a limited number of theaters before hitting “theaters everywhere” in December 1977.
SV Staff  |  Oct 05, 2017  |  3 comments
A momentous occasion in the history of consumer electronics took place 34 years ago this week when Sony offered the CDP-101 for sale in Japan.
SV Staff  |  Sep 28, 2017  |  0 comments
Twenty years ago today, Apple launched the iconic “Think Different” ad campaign, which still resonates today, 15 years after it ended.
SV Staff  |  Sep 21, 2017  |  1 comments
Twenty years ago this week, Microsoft introduced a new and improved WebTV, the interactive TV service it had purchased from internet TV pioneer Steve Perlman a few months earlier.

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