LATEST ADDITIONS

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Al Griffin Posted: May 25, 2017 1 comments
Got a tech question for Sound & Vision? Email us at AskSandV@gmail.com

A I’m using a Yamaha AX-497 integrated amplifier to power a pair of Elac speakers with a nominal 4-ohm impedance. I also have a Yamaha YST-SW315 subwoofer I’d like to use in my system. Here’s my question: If the speakers are wired directly to the amp as speaker pair A, and the powered subwoofer is connected as speaker pair B, can I power both simultaneously without damaging the amplifier? (The amplifier’s manual warns against connecting more than one pair of 4-ohm speakers.) For convenience reasons, I would rather not wire the main speakers through the subwoofer. —V.A. Dare / via e-mail

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SV Staff Posted: May 25, 2017 1 comments
CD was just beginning to catch on when Dire Straits released its fifth studio album Brothers in Arms in May 1985. Driven by the iconic (and controversial) hit single “Money For Nothing,” the album was the first to sell one million copies in the CD format and the first to outsell its LP counterpart.
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Barb Gonzalez Posted: May 24, 2017 0 comments
Net neutrality is being threatened again. What you can do to stop the repeal of the Title II Order that allows the FCC to protect our fair and free access to the internet.
Al Griffin Posted: May 24, 2017 3 comments

Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $300

AT A GLANCE
Plus
High-quality video upconversion of standard Blu-rays
Plays SACDs, DVD-Audio discs, and native DSD files
Inexpensive
Minus
No announced Dolby Vision support
No analog audio outputs

THE VERDICT
Sony’s ultra-affordable Ultra HD Blu-ray player offers solid video performance, and it also plays SACDs and DVD-Audio discs.

Call it nostalgia, but the launch of an audio or video format strikes me as an opportunity to reflect on what came before it—especially now, with the sun threatening to set on physical media. When the Blu-ray Disc first appeared a little more than a decade ago, Sony was among its main flagwavers. Not only that, but the company’s PlayStation 3 console was considered by many to be the top-performing player in the Blu-ray format’s primitive days. Samsung and Panasonic were quick to push out standalone Blu-ray players, but the folks at Sony took their sweet time bringing their own model to market. When the BDP-S1 did arrive, it was well received for its picture quality—though it had design quirks, including an inability to play CDs.

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SV Staff Posted: May 24, 2017 1 comments
Metallica photo: Ross Halfin

Nugs.net, the website dedicated downloading and streaming live music from some of the world’s largest touring acts, has adopted MQA’s Master Quality Authenticated audio encoding technology for the downloading and streaming services it provides for more than 1,000 artists.

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SV Staff Posted: May 24, 2017 3 comments
The entry of showrooming into the retail lexicon a few years ago portended the death of brick-and-mortar retailing—or so it seemed at the time. Consumers would visit stores to inspect the merch, then order it online.
SV Staff Posted: May 24, 2017 0 comments
iHome is kicking off Memorial Day Weekend with a line of funky outdoor speakers that play tunes on request.
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Steve Guttenberg Posted: May 23, 2017 0 comments
Performance
Build Quality
Comfort
Value
PRICE $399

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Brilliant styling
Built-in headphone amp
Click-on bass boost
Minus
Not super transparent

THE VERDICT
The Blue Sadie is one of the more unique headphones on the market. The look and feel are mighty impressive. The sound is up to snuff too!

Blue is known primarily as a high-end studio and consumer microphone manufacturer, but they broke into the headphone scene with their radically designed Mo-Fi back in 2014. I liked that headphone well enough, but it was heavy, and the sound balance struck me as a little too Beats inspired. Mo-Fi is history, but Blue’s new one goes by the name Sadie, and her sound is more in tune with audiophile tastes.

SV Staff Posted: May 23, 2017 0 comments
Marantz has packed a full suite of home theater and multiroom features into a pair of slimline AV receivers designed for tight spaces.
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Ken C. Pohlmann Posted: May 23, 2017 6 comments
In recent years, market trends have not been kind to Sony. The company has struggled to adapt to changing technologies and consumer tastes. Once a powerhouse, it slipped in stature and lost billions. But now, in its most recent corporate announcements, there may be a glimmer of hope.

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