CEDIA 2016

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Thomas J. Norton  |  Sep 16, 2016  |  0 comments
In an earlier blog I suggested that SIM2 with its new Nero4 projector was the first to use TI’s new pseudo 4K chip, meaning that it uses pixel shifting on its digital micromirrors to put the full resolution of a 4K source on screen, but not all at once. Half of the resolution is presented first, then microseconds later the mirrors shift by a fraction of a pixel and the rest of the image is displayed. Sounds fishy if you haven’t seen it, but it works...
Rob Sabin  |  Sep 16, 2016  |  1 comments
Bluesound, the hi-res compliant multiroom audio platform from Lenbrook, the makers of NAD audio electronics and PSB speakers, has added a critical new product at CEDIA in its first soundbar. Priced at $999 and available later this month, the Pulse Soundbar is designed for screens 42-inches or larger, and offers up a number of features that should please audiophiles who want to start building a Bluesound system or extend an existing system into the TV room.

Thomas J. Norton  |  Sep 16, 2016  |  0 comments
While Epson’s projector demos at CEDIA were designed to impress custom installers and the press (the latter hard to please but pussycats when you win them over), it did show this short throw projector designed for the business market...
Al Griffin  |  Sep 16, 2016  |  0 comments
Long known for affordable and custom install-friendly music servers, Fusion Research has a new model on display at CEDIA that combines two of its Solo servers in a single 1U chassis. The Duet ($799) provides two analog outputs using 192kHz/24-bit-capable Burr Brown DACs for installations where dual independent sources are required.
Thomas J. Norton  |  Sep 16, 2016  |  0 comments
Shown here are two of the new drivers used in RBH’s new Signature Reference speakers, as discussed in a previous blog—a new AMT tweeter (replacing the previous dome) and a new bass-midrange.
John Sciacca  |  Sep 15, 2016  |  First Published: Sep 16, 2016  |  1 comments
Traditionally movie servers have not been affordable, let alone cheap. However the idea of converting all of your DVDs and Blu-ray discs to digital data that you can easily browse and access instantly and stream around the home is so compelling, that anytime I run across a new company in the movie server category, I have to stop and take a look.

When I saw the onscreen cover art in Zappiti’s booth I was intrigued. The company had four components lined up that certainly looked like they meant business. A large NAS drive with eight bays and an internal DVD/Blu-ray drive, along with three separate movie players. When I heard the prices, I was shocked!

Al Griffin  |  Sep 16, 2016  |  0 comments
Thor, as we all know, is the hammer-wielding god from Norse mythology. Thor is also the name of Barco’s Residential’s flagship 4K projector, a refrigerator-size 4K DLP model that sells for nearly $400,000. Why would anyone pay that much for a video projector? Maybe you want the image in your home theater to not only match, but exceed the quality of your local cinema, even those RPX and ETX ones they charge a premium ticket price for.
Mark Fleischmann  |  Sep 16, 2016  |  0 comments
Bose aggressively downsized satellite speakers long before it became fashionable. The new Lifestyle 650 system continues the campaign with the OmniJewel, Bose's smallest satellite yet.

Al Griffin  |  Sep 16, 2016  |  0 comments
A big advantage of attending a show like CEDIA is getting the chance to hear demos of new object-based surround sound formats carried out with ultra-fancy high-end gear. One such demo of DTS:X was conducted by Datasat, a maker of surround processors and amps for professional digital cinemas and high-end home theaters.
Tom Norton  |  Sep 16, 2016  |  0 comments
The booths at CEDIA are invariably more modest in scale than what you’ll see at CES. But in LG’s case, that’s not for lack of trying. Outside the entrance, visible on the left side of the photo here, fifteen 55-inch OLED displays were clustered closely together, their thin bezels rendering the seams between them barely visible.
Thomas J. Norton  |  Sep 16, 2016  |  0 comments
The introduction and demonstration of Epson’s new(ish) Pro Cinema LS10500 Laser Diode illuminated 4Ke projector was one of the highlights of the show. It differs from the previous LS10500 mainly in the inclusion of HDR-capability.

The “e” in the 4Ke designation indicates that this projector, like all of the relatively affordable projectors available from Epson and JVC, uses pixel shift to display a 4K input...

Tom Norton  |  Sep 16, 2016  |  0 comments
At last year’s CEDIA we reported on a new DLP imagining chip from Texas Instruments that offered one-half the pixels required for full 4K resolution. To produce 4K, the digital micromirrors first display half the pixels in the image, then microseconds later shift by a fraction of a pixel to show the others. While this is similar to the pixel shifting (a.k.a. wobulation) now used by JVC in most of its projectors (the new BLUEscent excepted), and by Epson in its laser model, TI argues that its micromirrors can shift far more rapidly.
Thomas J. Norton  |  Sep 16, 2016  |  0 comments
Wolf Cinema demonstrated its SDC15 projector ($23,000 with Wolf’s outboard processor, $15,000 without) in a room it shared with RBH Sound. The latter included premier models from the RBH Signature Reference Series, upgraded with a new AMT tweeter and other refinements...
John Sciacca  |  Sep 15, 2016  |  First Published: Sep 16, 2016  |  0 comments
Auto tracking satellite antennas certainly aren’t anything new, but they have always come at a rather premium price. And, sure, if you want to roll down the highway in you Winnebago and have a dish continuously track satellites soaring overhead in geosynchronous orbit, well, that’s still gonna cost you.

But if you just want to pull up to a camp site, or parking lot for your pre-game tailgate, whip out a simple antenna and not have to futz around with aiming and azimuth and angle so you can enjoy a little TV before the big game, DISH is making that a whole lot simpler and cheaper for you to enjoy!

Al Griffin  |  Sep 16, 2016  |  0 comments
The BeoVision 14, a new Series of Ultra HDTVs unveiled by Danish manufacturer Bang & Olufsen today at its CEDIA press event, up the ante on the aesthetics front by providing an element not often seen in modern TV design: wood.

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