Vintage Gear

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SV Staff  |  Jul 12, 2019  |  0 comments
Nakamichi made a name for itself in the 1970s building high-end cassette decks that eked every last ounce of performance out of the tape format but the company also made CD players and changers for the home and car in the ’80s and ’90s.
Stewart Wolpin  |  Jul 01, 2019  |  4 comments
Forty years ago today Sony introduced a portable cassette player that would forever change the way the world experienced music on-the-go.
SV Staff  |  Jun 27, 2019  |  2 comments
New Jersey-based vintage audio specialist Skyfi Audio has something special for AV collectors: a vintage Akai 8-track player/recorder.
Stewart Wolpin  |  Jun 17, 2019  |  5 comments
Lemoyne Martin was unhappy. He’d just bought a Sony big screen TV, but now found the quality of his local cable TV service severely lacking.
SV Staff  |  May 23, 2019  |  0 comments
With its latest audio offering, New Jersey-based vintage audio specialist SkyFi Audio steps back in time but adds a modern twist.
SV Staff  |  May 09, 2019  |  0 comments
Hearkening back to the late ’70s , this gleaming Pioneer SPEC 1 preamp is one of the more striking stereo specimens from New Jersey-based vintage audio specialist SkyFi Audio.
SV Staff  |  Mar 28, 2019  |  1 comments
Skyfi Audio thinks so. The New Jersey-based vintage audio specialist recently showcased this wonderfully nostalgic rack of classic Marantz components.
Stewart Wolpin  |  Dec 30, 2018  |  0 comments
The RCA CT-100 and Admiral C1617A were the first color TVs offer for sale on December 30, 1953. Both had a 15-inch screen.

Even though 4K TVs have been on the market for less than five years, numerous companies will announce they’ll start selling 8K TVs at CES next week. This despite the fact that less than half of U.S. homes own a 4K TV, and there’s no 4K programming available yet on U.S. broadcast TV networ

Rob Sabin  |  Apr 26, 2018  |  5 comments
Julian Hirsch’s review of the Bose 901 in 1968 helped set off one of the greatest and longest-lasting audiophile debates.

There may be no singular product in modern audio history that has generated more accolades, derision, or pure controversy than the Bose 901 loudspeaker. Introduced in 1968 by a then four-year-old concern named after its MIT-educated founder, the 901 neither looked, nor sounded, like any speaker that had come before it. With its pentagonal cabinet that faced eight of its nine identical 4-inch, full-range drivers at the reflecting wall behind the speaker, its designer Amar Bose sought to have it mimic the way we hear in concert halls and imbue its sound with a giant soundstage and spatial realism that was unsurpassed.

SV Staff  |  Dec 15, 2016  |  0 comments
The Altec Lansing “Voice of the Theatre” speaker series has a storied past. Famous for its super high efficiency and lifelike sound—produced by a huge compression driver and 15-inch woofer mounted in a big, boxy enclosure—the speaker was adopted by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences as the industry standard for playback in movie theaters in the mid-1950s. The A7 model shown here went on to define an era of sound reproduction for movie theaters and beyond.
Steve Guttenberg  |  Apr 11, 2013  |  0 comments
Tube televisions are starting to look like relics of a bygone era, but they had a long run, from the very beginning of the TV age until just a few years ago. CRTs evolved from round, to rounded squares, to squarish, almost flat tubes—but cathode ray tube TVs (and projectors) remained the unchallenged display technology right through to the dawn of hi-def TV.
Steve Guttenberg  |  Mar 26, 2013  |  First Published: Mar 20, 2013  |  0 comments
In the days before the CD arrived in 1982, LPs were the format of choice for music lovers. While the turntable played a significant role in determining sound quality, you also needed a great phono cartridge to get the music out of the grooves.
Steve Guttenberg  |  Mar 14, 2013  |  1 comments
Life before the first VCRs arrived in the late 1970s was pretty boring. TV watching was limited to whatever meager offerings were available at that moment from broadcast and cable TV stations. VCRs and time shifting changed all that.
Steve Guttenberg  |  Feb 27, 2013  |  2 comments
Jim Winey didn’t set out to design a new type of speaker, just a better electrostatic speaker. He worked evenings, weekends, vacations, whenever he could starting in 1966, while he was still working for 3M as an engineer. His experiments with flexible bar magnets and Mylar led Winey to invent and patent the planar magnetic speaker.
Steve Guttenberg  |  Feb 14, 2013  |  9 comments
The Pioneer Kuro plasma display broke new ground upon its introduction in 2007 and was quickly hailed by critics and buyers as The Greatest Television Ever Made. Incredibly, as many Home Theater readers know, the Kuro line that debuted in 2007 was phased out by 2010—which proves that just because you make the best, doesn’t mean people will buy it.

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