HOME MOVIE THEATERS

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Thomas Kern, homeowner  |  Aug 22, 2007  |  9 comments

I've always loved going to the movies. Most of my childhood Saturday mornings were spent at the Palace Theater in Winchester, Virginia, where I could watch two films, cartoons, a newsreel, a short, and coming attractions—all for a quarter. About three years ago, I was surfing eBay and ran across a listing for a movie poster from the 1956 horror film The Mole People. I became obsessed with that poster and soon found myself in a fierce bidding war. Later, I realized what was really going on. The Mole People poster had rekindled those childhood memories, and I somehow wanted to go back in time and relive those special Saturdays. That's when I decided to design and build an ornate 1950s style home theater.

Glenn Mosby  |  Aug 28, 2007  |  0 comments

Having lived in our home since 1979, we are the third owners of this tiny 750-square-foot, 1.5 story, 1943 frame bungalow. In 1998 we decided on some major interior and exterior modifications, which I designed and we had done. The exterior changes gave the house a fresh, neomodern look without spoiling the home's original character lines, allowing it to still fit in with our neighborhood. The interior changes opened up our main floor plan. I have since caught the carpentry bug and now design and do my own work.

James Reedy  |  Aug 31, 2007  |  2 comments

<I>How I turned my passion for audio into my own theater.</I>

Bill Yung  |  Nov 05, 2007  |  5 comments

<I>A reader finds home theater inspiration in his first theater, giving him the craving to upgrade.</I>

Joe Klusnick  |  Nov 13, 2007  |  First Published: Nov 14, 2007  |  5 comments

<I>For my first true home theater, I didn't mess around.</I>

Tony Reimer  |  Aug 28, 2007  |  1 comments

Although it took a total of two years and six months of hard work, an equity line is what really helped me finish my theater. Home Theater magazine, Audio Video Interiors, and the Internet were my main sources of information. The room's dimensions are 13.5 by 19 by 8.33 feet, with a closet in the rear that houses the component rack. I gutted the room to the studs, even the ceiling, and installed a dedicated power circuit for audio, video, and lighting. I ran all the wiring for low voltage in the crawl space and for high voltage in the attic. Some crossing was unavoidable, but, at 90-degree angles, I've had no problems. To begin color selection, I started with the ceiling. I simulated the night sky with Ralph Lauren flat paint in magistrate black. I took a paint chip with me to the garment district in L.A. and found curtain fabric. With those colors to work with, I picked out the wall and trim paint and the carpet to match. I already had the black leather furniture.

James Robinson  |  Aug 28, 2007  |  First Published: Aug 29, 2007  |  2 comments

<I>From 30,000 feet to reality. </I>

Tom J. Slager, Homeowner  |  Aug 28, 2007  |  1 comments

After several years of reading about the home theater experience, my family and I finally decided to convert some unused basement space into our own dedicated theater. Since I enjoy doing home-improvement projects, I chose to do most of the construction myself and to hire a reliable company to provide and integrate the audio/video components. I had constructed a small, built-in entertainment center a few years before in our home in Cincinnati, Ohio, but had never done a project as large as this.

Doug Christianson  |  Sep 03, 2007  |  11 comments

<I>An electrical background and a passion for gear garnered this reader a great DIY theater. </I>

Charles Bloom  |  Aug 28, 2007  |  First Published: Aug 29, 2007  |  2 comments

<I>Everything I needed was online. </I>

Grant and Cathy Ovsak  |  Oct 03, 2007  |  7 comments

<I>How we transformed our room from Brady Bunch shag to old-Hollywood glamour.</I>

Bob Yazel, Homeowner  |  Aug 22, 2007  |  0 comments

Our home theater started out as an unfinished basement room with dimensions of 14 by 18 by 9 feet. The room is rectangular, with three doors and no windows. Audio problems are inherently more difficult to solve than video problems. Fortunately, the room dimensions are friendly to acoustic resonances. Since the theater would be right under the great room of the house, the main goal was to decouple the theater from the rest of the house as best as possible.

Tim Kulin  |  Oct 17, 2010  |  12 comments

I'm the owner of a small cabinet shop and decided to built this attractive and highly functional entertainment center in my home. All the woodworking throughout the room is mine (except for the chairs). It's all made from Alder that is finished in honey stain with a sable glaze. While it may look like wall paper, the wall treatment is a faux finish.

Mike Ellsworth  |  Aug 30, 2011  |  0 comments
Photos by Kristine Crosby

When it came time to build a home theater in the basement of our home (14.5 by 18.5 feet), my wife set the tone by requesting a traditional movie theater décor with a touch of whimsy. On the technical side, I was most concerned about the installation and soundproofing to ensure it sounded as terrific as it looked. The walls, stage, and seating platform are all filled with insulation, and the walls are covered with sound panels, made from 1-inch-thick batting, and covered with velvet fabric and then framed with wood trim boxes. Molding added the extra bit of elegance, and pillars gave the room dimension and function. Doubling as sound panels, two of the pillars have cabinet doors. One of them opens to reveal the equipment rack; the other has shelves for storage.

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