PROJECTOR REVIEWS

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Thomas J. Norton  |  May 30, 2004  |  0 comments

Apart from a slight change in the color of the case, there's little that visibly distinguishes Sharp's new XV-Z12000 DLP home theater projector from its predecessor, the XV-Z10000. The winner of our last Editors' Choice Platinum Award, in January 2004, the Z10000 sailed through the viewing sessions for its coverage in SGHT: a full review in October 2003 and a "Take 2" in November.

Geoffrey Morrison  |  Mar 10, 2006  |  0 comments
How do you follow up a winner?

Way back in our July 2004 issue, we reviewed this projector's predecessor, which wasn't known as the MARK I. We liked the XV-Z12000's performance so much, we gave it our 2005 RAVE Award for Best Overall Projector. Just a few months shy of two years later, we got a chance to play with the MARK II version.

 |  Nov 19, 2005  |  0 comments

Sharp practically put DLP front projection on the map as a high performance solution when it introduced its XV-Z9000 projector a few years ago. That projector featured the first generation "Mustang Chip," the first 16:9 native 720p DLP chipset from Texas Instruments. Sharp's SharpVision projector line has continued to evolve with TI's chips, with each new generation making incremental improvements over past models. We continue to be compelled to look at each iteration because Sharp's line has remained reasonably priced (between $11-$12k MSRP with "street prices" closer to $10k) and never given up much in pure performance even when compared to premium projectors costing much more.

Thomas J. Norton  |  Jul 06, 2009  |  0 comments
Price: $2,500 At A Glance: Outstanding video processing • Deep blacks (with auto iris) • Brightness to spare for a big screen

Sharp has a long history in the home theater projector business. It began with a successful run of LCD models. But the company soon shifted its projectors to Texas Instruments’ DLP technology, which appeared to be ready to dominate the projection business for a time.

However, with the development of new and vastly improved LCD chips and designs in the recent past, all that has changed. LCD (and its second cousin, LCOS—a variation on liquid crystal technology) now dominates the projection market. Sharp is sticking to DLP, and its new XV-Z15000 is one of the first DLP designs to sport a new 0.65-inch digital micromirror device (DMD) from Texas Instruments. The DMD is the imaging chip at the heart of the DLP system.

Thomas J. Norton  |  Sep 21, 2011  |  1 comments
2D Performance
3D Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
Price: $5,500 At A Glance: Bright, punchy images • Good (though not highly accurate) color • Middling black level and contrast

Many of us here at Home Theater are big on 3D, but a lot of front-projection fans have been holding off. Until recently, their only options in the $5,000 3D projector market were two identical JVC models (sold either through that company’s pro or consumer distribution channels).

Peter Putman  |  Apr 17, 2005  |  0 comments

Sharp's XV-Z2000 front DLP projector raised more than a few eyebrows when it first appeared at CEDIA Expo 2004. Was this indeed the first 1280x720 HD2+ DLP projector for less than $5000? If so, it would represent a seismic but long overdue change in DLP projector pricing, which has typically kept the MSRPs of 720p models above $7000—and, by extension, non-competitive with 720p LCD projectors that retail for half of that price or less.

Thomas J. Norton  |  Jan 14, 2007  |  0 comments

When 1080p home theater projectors were introduced a year or so ago, a funny thing happened on the way to the party.

Thomas J. Norton  |  Dec 03, 2006  |  0 comments

The Sharp XV-Z20000 is the third 1080p single-chip DLP projector to pass through our doors. At $11,999 it bucks a growing trend to less expensive, high resolution projectors. But it's far lower in price than competitors such as the $20,000 <A HREF=" http://ultimateavmag.com/videoprojectors/506marantzvp11s1/"> Marantz VP-11S1</A> or SIM2's $15K <A HREF="http://www.ultimateavmag.com/firstlookvideoprojectors/506sim2ht3000/">
HT3000</A>. And it offers a lot for the money.

Geoffrey Morrison  |  Apr 15, 2007  |  First Published: Mar 26, 2007  |  0 comments
What 1080p was made for.

Despite my, and others', repeated assurances that you don't need 1080p on a 42-inch display, that seems to be what people keep concentrating on. Such resolution is wasted on a small screen (unless you're sitting on it). But, in this "mine has more resolution than yours" world, I guess such competitive behavior is inevitable. So, what about the displays that can take advantage of 1080p? Sure, depending on where you're sitting, an RPTV can do so. But, with all the concessions to price, brightness, and market competition, you still won't be getting everything out of the signal. There are a few flat panels that would work. In a size that would let you see 1080p from any distance, though, you'd be looking at the price of a good Mercedes. So, that leaves front projection.

Geoffrey Morrison  |  Sep 08, 2006  |  0 comments
A deal in performance clothing

I love surprises. Ok, that's a lie. I hate surprises. How is giving me an attack of tachycardia (learned that one on House) anyone's idea of a good time. But, in the HT world, surprises are usually good. Take this $3,000 projector, for instance. By all accounts, it should be an average performing mid-to-low-priced HD projector. Then you look at the contrast-ratio measurement and see it's better than every other projector we've ever reviewed. Surprise!

Shane Buettner  |  Sep 12, 2006  |  First Published: Sep 13, 2006  |  0 comments
  • $3,499
  • 1280x768 single-chip DarkChip2 DLP
  • Key Connections: One HDMI input, two component video inputs, one RGB/PC on 15-pin DSUB
Features We Like: TI's 10-bit BrilliantColor video processing, Sharp's Color Management System, adjustable iris allows tailoring of light output
Michael Fremer  |  Feb 10, 2002  |  0 comments

You want to believe. I want to believe. We all want to believe that, some day, a tiny chip the size of a 35mm transparency in a video-display device the size and weight of a slide projector will be capable of producing a moving video image so exquisitely filmlike that it will banish bulky, expensive, tweaky CRT projectors to the trash heap of technological history.

Kevin Miller  |  Jan 03, 2002  |  First Published: Jan 04, 2002  |  0 comments
Welcome to a new era of DLP performance.

In terms of video performance, DLP-projection technology for home theater applications has just taken a major leap forward. Sharp's new XV-Z9000U is the first DLP projector based on Texas Instruments' new native 16:9, 1,280-by-720-resolution chip. This projector promises to radically change the front-projector market, as it offers unprecedented picture quality in its product category at a very reasonable price. At a list price of $10,995, the XV-Z9000U comes close to delivering the same picture quality as 7- and 8-inch CRT-based front projectors that range in price from $15,000 to $30,000. The XV-Z9000U is one of those rare products in the home theater industry that elevates its category to a performance level that many of us previously thought was unachievable.

Ultimate AV Staff  |  May 24, 2006  |  0 comments

<IMG SRC="/images/archivesart/506sharpZ20000.jpg" WIDTH=200 HEIGHT=102>

Thomas J. Norton  |  Apr 23, 2006  |  0 comments

When manufacturers announced the first three-chip DLPs aimed at the home theater market, my first thought was, "I'm there!" One thing about even the best single-chip DLPs continued to bug me: those pesky rainbows.

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