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Ken Richardson  |  Jun 10, 2002  |  0 comments

If you're one of the 1,000 acts playing SXSW - the South by Southwest Music Festival, which despite its name and its Austin, Texas, location is the nation's biggest live-music shebang - how do you get noticed? I didn't notice Braxton Hicks two years ago.

David Ranada  |  Jun 09, 2002  |  0 comments

The steady progression of compressed digital audio into all sorts of places (do you really need to listen to Mozart on a PDA?) is raising all sorts of issues. But none is more important to readers of Sound & Vision than the ability of the codecs - the encode/decode software - to faithfully reproduce music after compressing CD tracks to file sizes that can be easily downloaded or stored.

Al Griffin  |  May 15, 2002  |  0 comments

Compared with the "in the lab" box for one of our test reports on, say, an A/V receiver, the lab data for a TV review may seem skimpy. While there aren't a lot of numbers, the ones we do generate can give you a pretty good idea of what to expect from the set - particularly its color reproduction, which is arguably the most important aspect of a TV's performance.

John Sciacca  |  May 15, 2002  |  0 comments

You finally made the plunge - you bought a new TV. After countless hours of research and comparing Model A to Model B, you're ready to get down to business. So you pop in a demo DVD, fire up the audio system, adjust the lighting, sit back in your favorite chair, and press play. But something isn't right. Everyone looks a little sunburned.

Chris Lewis  |  May 09, 2002  |  First Published: May 10, 2002  |  0 comments
Our first look at Ultra 2 and the first certified system from Snell and Pioneer.

It may be time to start asking the question that's asked of all pastimes with hobbyist roots when their popularity surges: Is home theater a permanent cultural phenomenon or just another fad destined to burn out before its time? Recent evidence certainly shades the former. DVD-Video has been the catalyst for an unprecedented boom in the popularity of home theater and should probably be credited with completing home theater's undeniable transition from novelty act to mainstream entertainment that began with Dolby Surround and the first inexpensive multichannel speaker system. But is home theater a cultural phenomenon the way that the computer is a cultural phenomenon? Do a majority of Americans actively seek to make it a part of their lives day in and day out? Not yet—but home theater's high-water mark is still to come.

David Katzmaier  |  May 01, 2002  |  0 comments

Leave it to Apple to encase the latest technology in a wrapper so irresistible that it appeals both to cutting-edge technophiles and to people who care more about how something looks than how it works.

Ken C. Pohlmann  |  Apr 18, 2002  |  0 comments

Psst! Hey, you! That's right - you! You wanna hot deal on a DVD player? I've got an SUV full of factory-fresh hardware. There are a few scratches and dents, and maybe some broken glass inside, but I'll give you my full lifetime warranty. Any problems - just bring it back to me here, in the alley off Broadway.

Daniel Kumin  |  Apr 18, 2002  |  0 comments

There once was a time when audio/video components didn't have USB or Ethernet ports. When "kilobits per second" was not a hi-fi term. When a kid who stumbled over a stack of LPs in a dumpster actually knew what they were.

Josef Krebs  |  Apr 18, 2002  |  0 comments

Since he first delighted audiences and divided critics with his stylized, idiosyncratic first feature, Strictly Ballroom, writer/ director Baz Luhrmann has gone on to make Romeo+Juliet and Moulin Rouge - each more ambitious, more stylized, and more dividing of critics than the last. Each has also had greater success at the box office and in accumulating awards both in the U.S.

SV Staff  |  Apr 02, 2002  |  0 comments

Wild Blue Yonder Okay, I know I shouldn't gloat. But I told you so. The breathtaking, commercial-free imagery of a packaged HDTV medium would persuade people to watch less broadcast and cable TV. That new medium has arrived.

Al Griffin  |  Apr 02, 2002  |  0 comments

There's no denying that digital high-definition TV (HDTV) is a vast improvement over our old analog TV system, but if you want to record any of the high-def programs delivered over the air by local broadcasters or via satellite from Dish Network or DirecTV, your options are ridiculously limited.

Brian C. Fenton  |  Apr 02, 2002  |  0 comments

Because every new format seems to set off a format war, we were a little surprised when nine major electronics manufacturers announced that they actually agreed on what the next-generation recordable optical-disc format should be.

Doug Newcomb  |  Apr 02, 2002  |  0 comments

Four of Hollywood's home-video heavies - DreamWorks, 20th Century Fox, Artisan Entertainment, and Universal Studios - have thrown their weight behind a format for distributing films in high-definition, the JVC-developed D-Theater variant of D-VHS.

David Ranada  |  Apr 02, 2002  |  0 comments

Okay, I know I shouldn't gloat. But I told you so. In a keynote speech at the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) annual convention a year ago, I warned that if the broadcast and cable industries didn't get their act together when it came to putting high-definition signals out there in a big way, high-def programming would be provided by other means.

David Ranada  |  Apr 01, 2002  |  0 comments

At $2,800, the least expensive Vaio PC in Sony's MX desktop line doesn't seem like much of a bargain these days, even for a 1.7-GHz, Pentium 4 with an 80-gigabyte (GB) hard drive, 512 megabytes (MB) of memory, the exciting "home" version of Windows XP, and two better-than-average speakers (the 15-inch Sony LCD monitor shown is $600 extra).

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