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David Ranada  |  Dec 02, 2002  |  0 comments
Within seconds of firing up Miramax's DVD release of the classic Beatles movie A Hard Day's Night, I knew that the Fab Four had been deep-sixed by the new set's producers. The image quality is excellent-the movie appears for the first time in a widescreen (1.66:1) video transfer-but the music is another story.
Rich Warren  |  Nov 20, 2002  |  0 comments
Photos by Tony Cordoza

Spend $850 on a used car, and in a few days you'll spend another $850 on repair costs. Invest $850 in the stock market, and in a few weeks you'll have $600 worth. Spend $850 on Cambridge SoundWorks' new MegaTheater 510 DVD home theater system, and in a few minutes you'll have more entertainment than you bargained for.

Ken C. Pohlmann  |  Nov 18, 2002  |  0 comments
Photos by Jayme Thornton
Also check out: Stocking stuffers Personal audio players
Spouses, children, in-laws, out-laws, parents, siblings, business associates, mailmen, mailwomen, girlfriends, and boyfriends all deserve a little something from you when the holidays roll around.
Al Griffin  |  Nov 18, 2002  |  0 comments
Photo by Tony Cordoza

When Apple introduced its lower-priced line of iMacs in 1998, it made a big step toward its goal of getting Macintosh computers in the hands of a wider range of users. The line has undergone a number of changes since then, with new iMacs sporting everything from psychedelic candy-color cases to powerful built-in video editing capabilities.

SV Staff  |  Nov 17, 2002  |  0 comments
Checking out the Sound & Vision Reviewer's Choice Awards is probably the quickest way there is to get a reading on the state of the home entertainment art. The 1999 awards featured the groundbreaking Rio MP3 player, Philips's first-generation TiVo hard-disk-drive recorder, and the first Super Audio CD player.
Michael Riggs  |  Nov 03, 2002  |  0 comments
Photo by Tony Cordoza

Portable MP3 players have gone from novelty to staple item in four short years. But with popularity has come proliferation, and many MP3 players aren't just MP3 players anymore. A growing number play files encoded in the Windows Media Audio (WMA) and Advanced Audio Coding (AAC) formats as well, and the storage options are many.

Michael Antonoff  |  Nov 03, 2002  |  0 comments
Palm-size jukeboxes that hold hundreds of hours of MP3 music on an embedded hard drive are no longer a novelty. Now Archos has taken the category to the next level by adding a 1 1/2-inch color LCD, the ability to store and play photo slideshows or highly compressed but full-motion video, and direct A/V output to a TV.
David Ranada  |  Oct 21, 2002  |  0 comments
As I write these words, right around the corner from Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood, Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates and his pals James Cameron, Peter Gabriel, Beatles' producer Sir George Martin, and LL Cool J-Microsoft calls him "a major music artist and film actor"-introduced with typical extravagance the clumsily named Windows Media 9 Series, the technologies formerly c
John Sciacca  |  Oct 21, 2002  |  0 comments
Illustration by Chris Gould; room photo by Tony Cordoza

See if this doesn't sound familiar: You don't just love movies, you love the whole moviegoing experience. When the time comes to check out a film, you drive miles out of your way to go to the best theater around-one with stadium seating, digital surround sound, and that awesome THX trailer that comes on before the movie.

Michael Antonoff  |  Sep 22, 2002  |  0 comments
Photo by Tony Cordoza
Check it out: Getting HDTV on Cable
Rumors began circulating in the fall of 2001 among the more technologically advanced New York City customers of Time Warner Cable (TWC) that there was a secret HDTV waiting list hidden from the customer-service representatives, the people who u
Ian G. Masters  |  Sep 02, 2002  |  0 comments
"Only connect," the novelist E. M. Forster famously urged. But many people suffer from connectophobia - a paralyzing fear that can strike when you take your new Dolby Digital receiver out of the box and first lay eyes on its back panel.
Chris Chiarella  |  Sep 02, 2002  |  First Published: Sep 03, 2002  |  0 comments
A bigger hard drive, a little time, and you're halfway there. I'm a lucky guy. My wife and I have had only one major squabble since the beginning of the year, and it was about sharing the space on our personal video recorder's rapidly filling hard drive. My problem: I've fallen behind in archiving and deleting my keeper episodes. Hers: She waits too long to watch her recorded Ally McBeal, Buffy, and Friends, and the PVR automatically purges them. Although many possible solutions exist (Ally was cancelled, thankfully), the simplest would be to add a larger hard drive. Compared with the purchase of a newer, higher-capacity PVR, this approach is quite economical, and it's a project that a home theater buff with some electronics/computer expertise can tackle.
Stephen A. Booth  |  Aug 21, 2002  |  0 comments
Illustrations by Sandra Shap

You're all set to record a pay-per-view movie through the digital set-top box your cable provider installed just hours ago. But when you program it to record, your DVD recorder flashes a cryptic message indicating that the show can't be copied. Must be the usual screw-up by the cable company, you reason.

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