TV Reviews

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Greg Tarr  |  Apr 10, 2024  |  0 comments

Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $6,300

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Significantly brighter HDR peak luminance than 2023
Great gaming features
Attractive design, nearly invisible bezel border
ATSC 3.0 over-the-air tuning
Attractive and snappy smart TV interface
Minus
Screen picks up room reflections when using stand.
Continued dearth of native 8K content
Lacks codecs like VVC likely to be used with future 8K content
No Dolby Vision support

THE VERDICT
Samsung's QN75QN900D Neo QLED 8K TV impresses with bright HDR, smart features, and AI game mode, offering stunning visuals from 4K and Full HD sources. Its speed and responsiveness make it a top choice for gaming, appealing to those willing to invest in premium 8K technology.

The QN75QN900D Neo QLED is Samsung's 2024 flagship 8K mini-LED LCD TV series, and it delivers a brilliantly bright, colorful, and detailed picture from most content. The series replaces last year's flagship Samsung 8K Neo QLED, offering a thinner panel design and a significantly brighter picture.
Greg Tarr  |  Mar 28, 2024  |  1 comments

Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $3,500

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Ultra bright picture for an OLED display Wide natural color gamut coverage Impressive matte anti-reflective screen Low input lag and high refresh rate for gaming
Minus
No ATSC 3.0 NextGen TV tuner
Slight blooming from anti-glare technology
No Dolby Vision HDR
No Google Assistant voice support

THE VERDICT
This series greatly improves Quantum-OLED tech's brightness game. It has an excellent reflection-reducing screen that sets it apart from other Quantum OLEDs we've seen. It's worth the extra cost over a 2023 S95C close-out. But you will likely find a better deal if you wait for key sales events later in the year.

Samsung's 77-inch QN77S95D TV is the third version of its OLED TVs, which combine quantum dots and blue OLED light. This technology is called "Quantum-OLED" by Samsung Electronics and "QD-OLED" by Samsung Display, the company that makes the screens. It uses quantum dots to change blue OLED light to red and green light for its RGB pixels.

Mark Henninger  |  Dec 27, 2023  |  11 comments

Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value

PRICE $2,500

AT A GLANCE
Plus
High value for price
Superior picture quality
Works in bright settings
Low Lag and High Refresh Rate
Minus
Potential for image retention and burn-in
Lacks support for Dolby Vision
77-inch is the largest size with QD-OLED

THE VERDICT
When a TV's picture quality is the top priority over screen size, you won't do better than this 77-inch quantum-dot OLED from Samsung.

It is a small miracle that you can buy a TV as good as the 77-inch Samsung S90C Quantum Dot OLED for $2500. But that's where we're at, as the year 2024 begins. The price premium paid for early adoption has long since passed, and the TV's current pricing makes it an exceptional value for those who prize high contrast and deep blacks and extremely intense colors.

Tom Norton  |  Nov 08, 2023  |  3 comments

Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $1,800

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Black levels
Superb color
Affordability
Minus
Menu ergonomics
Remote control

THE VERDICT
Even before calibration, this Sony produced superb images. But calibration truly brought out the best from it in both HDR to SDR. Our samples offered slightly less luminance in HDR than expected, but that was quickly forgotten once the lights dimmed and the viewing began.

For several years now OLED has been king of the HDTV hill, offering the best available HDTV performance. This isn't to say that it has been free of issues; no technology is perfect.

Tom Norton  |  Sep 05, 2023  |  4 comments

Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $2,800

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Screen size
Black levels
Price
Minus
Limited off-center viewing
Cluttered remote

THE VERDICT
The TCL 85QM8 has a few annoying ergonomic issues, and like most LED/LCD sets its off-center viewing won't challenge an OLED. But its performance is impressive, and its price unexpectedly affordable. Properly adjusted, and on source material ranging from the routine to the awesomely difficult, its performance was consistently irresistible.

One significant difference between building a home theater around a video projector or a conventional flat-screen television has been image size. Projector fans will point to the immersion that big-screen projection offers, with the screen size limited mainly by your available space, imagination, and budget. Until recently, however, TVs bigger than 65-inches were priced beyond the means of most consumers.

Mark Henninger  |  Jun 26, 2023  |  9 comments

Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $1,800

AT A GLANCE
Plus
State-of-the-art graphics
Great for gaming and productivity
Statement-making design
Packed with smart features
Factory calibrated
Minus
Pricey
Needs a powerful PC for gaming

THE VERDICT
With its combination of quantum-dot OLED display tech and a 32:9 aspect ratio, 49-inch screen Samsung's latest ultra-wide monitor is a gamer's delight while also serving as a reference-quality productivity tool.

The Samsung OLED G95SC is a genuine "world's first" with a 240 Hz 49-inch QD-OLED screen. The result is an ultra-thin profile and light weight that make it surprisingly easy to assemble and adjust despite its epic dimensions. Its $2,200 MSRP may be high but is a reflection of the cutting-edge technology found within.

Mark Henninger  |  Apr 06, 2023  |  6 comments

Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $950 (updated 11/30/23)

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Very bright
Deep blacks
Excellent contrast
QLED wide color gamut
Easy to use
Stylish
Minus
Limited viewing angles

THE VERDICT
The combination of high contrast, brightness, and excellent color accuracy right out of the box make TCL's 65R655 a great choice for a main living room TV and many other applications.

It is amazing how rapidly TVs have grown in capability while their prices have dropped, defying inflation. I am very familiar with TCL's 6 Series and remember its first U.S. market iteration. It was an affordable 55-inch 4K TV that turned out to be great for both movies and gaming, thanks to its ease of use and nice, contrasty screen.

Mark Henninger  |  Dec 23, 2022  |  12 comments

Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $40,000

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Incredible brightness
Cutting-edge picture quality
Lays flat on wall
Minus
No Dolby Vision
Extremely expensive

THE VERDICT
A 4K tour-de-force from Samsung, the QN100B loves to show you what's missing from less capable TVs.

Samsung's over-the-top 98-inch Neo QLED showcases what's possible when a TV has the horsepower needed to handle HDR properly. What's mind-blowing is in HDR mode, its measured brightness can exceed 1000 nits, full-screen. Few TVs of any size can achieve this level of brightness, and the QN100B does it while preserving extremely high contrast and offering a wide color gamut. The resulting picture quality is thought-provoking, even at this price point, because it begs the question of what to prioritize for the ultimate home viewing experience: Size or HDR capability.

Thomas J. Norton  |  Nov 09, 2022  |  7 comments

Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $1900

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Superb HDR
Outstanding contrast
Wide viewing angle
Minus
No Dolby Vision
Frustrating menus

THE VERDICT
An appealing price for what is essentially a new and ground-breaking application of OLED is almost as much of a surprise as how much Samsung has upped the ante on what we can expect from an OLED HDTV.

We've become so accustomed to what an OLED TV can do that we risk reciting its benefits in our sleep. Great black levels, check. Viewable with little picture change from as far off center as you might want to sit, double check. Bright enough for modestly lit to very dark rooms (but not a sun porch!), check. High prices? That too. But in the past few years, nothing dramatic has muscled its way into the OLED world, though prices have slowly become less intimidating—until now. Samsung, which for years resisted joining the OLED TV parade, has developed a relatively radical way to build an OLED display with Quantum Dot Technology.

Thomas J. Norton  |  Nov 17, 2021  |  11 comments

Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $2,800

AT A GLANCE
Plus
High peak brightness for an OLED
Unrestricted viewing angle
Vivid color and powerful contrast
Minus
Remote control can be confusing
Cluttered smart TV home screen

THE VERDICT
Featuring an upgraded OLED panel, LG's new G1 “Gallery” model sets a new standard for OLED peak brightness while otherwise maintaining the company's traditionally impressive overall video performance.

LG's G1 "Gallery Design" TVs are the company's flagship OLED models for 2021, replacing last year's GX series. The now-discontinued WX models excepted, the G1 series comprises the slenderest Ultra HDTV line we've yet seen.

Thomas J. Norton  |  Nov 10, 2021  |  1 comments

Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $1,000

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Good image contrast
Crisp picture detail
Affordable price
Minus
Limited off-center viewing angle
Limited HDR brightness
Cluttered screen interface

THE VERDICT
When it comes to TVs, Vizio has always been serious about keeping the quality high and the prices low. That program continues with the company’s new M-Series Quantum, making this set worthy of serious consideration.

Veteran videophiles will recall the days when flat-panel TVs were almost impossibly expensive. But bigscreen set prices have dropped dramatically in recent years. We might "blame" Vizio for that, as it was among the first companies to challenge the status quo. Today it's not the only one offering affordable TVs, but its newest M-Series Quantum models make a strong case for the company's continued design and marketing savvy.

Thomas J. Norton  |  Sep 08, 2021  |  4 comments

Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $2,600

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Standard-setting HDR performance
Wide viewing angle for LCD
Deep blacks and strong shadow detail
Minus
Lacks Dolby Vision
Occasional blooming artifacts

THE VERDICT
The price for Samsung's latest sets may be up from last year's equivalent models, but if you're in the market for a new TV, the improvements to be found in the new QN90A series make it worth serious consideration.

In 2020, Sound & Vision tested Samsung's 65-inch Q90T series TV, an LCD model that lacked some of the features and refinements found in the company's flagship sets from the previous year. But at $1,900, it also struck us as a solid deal given the overall price-performance ratio and received a Top Pick. Samsung's new Neo QLED QN90A series LCDs, available in 55-, 65-, 75-, and 85-inch screen sizes, are pricier than the Q90T models they replace, though the higher prices in this case come with marked performance upgrades.

Thomas J. Norton  |  Aug 04, 2021  |  4 comments

Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $2,299

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Crisp resolution from Cognitive Processor XR
Ultra-wide viewing angle
Impressive shadow detail
Minus
Picture setup menu limitations
Minor black level issues with HDR

THE VERDICT
Sony's 65A80J delivers top-shelf video performance, HDMI 2.1 connectivity, along with many of the same features found in the company's flagship A90J OLED models at a significantly lower price.

Sony's new XR-65A80J OLED TV isn't a member of the company's Master Series—that designation belongs to its XR-A90J OLED models, which are spec'd to deliver higher brightness than the XR-A80J sets. And while we haven't yet tested those pricier Sony OLEDs, the XR-65A80J is far from being a second-class citizen.

The A80J's physical design is solid and well-executed. If you opt for a conventional installation instead of a wall-mount, its feet can be installed either 40 inches or 27.3 inches apart to accommodate a wide range of TV stands or cabinets, and they can also be slightly elevated to make space for a soundbar.

Thomas J. Norton  |  Feb 17, 2021  |  4 comments

Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $1,000

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Effective, 160- zone local-dimming
App-based color calibration
Affordable price
Minus
Image quality reduced at off-center seats
Some green push with HDR content

THE VERDICT
TCL's 6-Series UHD Roku TV brings the benefits of Mini-LED backlighting to a very affordable price point.

In late 2019, TCL flew me to the company's U.S. offices in California to spend an afternoon with its new flagship, the 75Q825 8-Series UHD Roku TV, a 75-inch 4K LCD model. Not all of the set's firmware was complete, but we took advantage of the opportunity to give our readers a sneak preview. The 75Q825's signature feature was TCL's use of mini-LEDs for backlighting, and at its then price of $3,000, it was something of an outlier for a brand associated with budget TVs.

Thomas J. Norton  |  Dec 16, 2020  |  10 comments


Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $1,900

AT A GLANCE
Plus
High peak brightness for HDR
Wide viewing angle for an LCD TV
Extended color
Minus
No Dolby Vision support
Some visible “blooming”

THE VERDICT
Samsung's 65-inch Q90T series model offers impressive overall performance at a far lower price than the company's previous flagship 4K TVs.

While most buyers might view two grand as a high price to pay for a new TV, longtime readers here will recall the days when that amount would barely get you a small, flat-panel HD set with few features—and certainly not 4K with HDR. But intense competition in the TV world has resulted in bigger and more sophisticated displays at lower prices. Samsung's Q90T series, including the 65-inch model reviewed here, is actually derived from the company's 2019 Q80R series.

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