Greg Tarr

Greg Tarr  |  Apr 10, 2024  |  0 comments

Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $6,300

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Significantly brighter HDR peak luminance than 2023
Great gaming features
Attractive design, nearly invisible bezel border
ATSC 3.0 over-the-air tuning
Attractive and snappy smart TV interface
Minus
Screen picks up room reflections when using stand.
Continued dearth of native 8K content
Lacks codecs like VVC likely to be used with future 8K content
No Dolby Vision support

THE VERDICT
Samsung's QN75QN900D Neo QLED 8K TV impresses with bright HDR, smart features, and AI game mode, offering stunning visuals from 4K and Full HD sources. Its speed and responsiveness make it a top choice for gaming, appealing to those willing to invest in premium 8K technology.

The QN75QN900D Neo QLED is Samsung's 2024 flagship 8K mini-LED LCD TV series, and it delivers a brilliantly bright, colorful, and detailed picture from most content. The series replaces last year's flagship Samsung 8K Neo QLED, offering a thinner panel design and a significantly brighter picture.
Greg Tarr  |  Mar 28, 2024  |  1 comments

Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $3,500

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Ultra bright picture for an OLED display Wide natural color gamut coverage Impressive matte anti-reflective screen Low input lag and high refresh rate for gaming
Minus
No ATSC 3.0 NextGen TV tuner
Slight blooming from anti-glare technology
No Dolby Vision HDR
No Google Assistant voice support

THE VERDICT
This series greatly improves Quantum-OLED tech's brightness game. It has an excellent reflection-reducing screen that sets it apart from other Quantum OLEDs we've seen. It's worth the extra cost over a 2023 S95C close-out. But you will likely find a better deal if you wait for key sales events later in the year.

Samsung's 77-inch QN77S95D TV is the third version of its OLED TVs, which combine quantum dots and blue OLED light. This technology is called "Quantum-OLED" by Samsung Electronics and "QD-OLED" by Samsung Display, the company that makes the screens. It uses quantum dots to change blue OLED light to red and green light for its RGB pixels.

Greg Tarr  |  Feb 10, 2003  |  0 comments
Illustrations by Jack Gallagher Whether you think the transition to digital television (DTV) broadcasting made a lot of progress in 2002 will depend on whether you tend to see water glasses as half empty or half full. Sales of high-definition digital televisions (HDTVs) gained momentum as prices dropped.
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