Michael Trei

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Michael Trei  |  Nov 02, 2007  |  0 comments

the listMost of us are familiar with the old saying that children should be seen and not heard. How might we apply similar thinking to loudspeakers? Just the word loudspeaker suggests something that needs to be heard clearly.

Michael Trei  |  Oct 01, 2007  |  0 comments

In some ways, selling speakers is a bit like selling men's suits. Sure, you need to keep plenty of choices on hand so you can cater to a wide range of tastes and budgets. But you don't want to get stuck with a bunch of items in, say, mauve, which you're going to stay stuck with for years.

Michael Trei  |  Jul 04, 2007  |  0 comments

Photo Gallery

Michael Trei  |  Jul 04, 2007  |  0 comments

Placement. First, don't locate the turntable on a surface or in a cabinet that also supports loudspeakers, or in the acoustic peak of a room mode, as nothing will screw up your sound more than feeding energy back into the turntable.

Michael Trei  |  May 02, 2007  |  0 comments

the listJust as with celebrity models, the trend in speakers these days seems to be toward the ever more slender yet exquisitely tall and glamorous.

Michael Trei  |  Mar 10, 2006  |  0 comments
Flexibility and value from a Scottish benchmark.

Imagine what it would be like if shopping for a new car involved the same number of decisions we must make when buying a home theater system. First, we would pick an engine, then we'd need a chassis to mount it in, and, to top it off, we would hire a coach builder to design a body to our specifications. This is, in fact, the way people bought luxury cars prior to World War II, before the car companies came to recognize that advancing technology required them to think of the design as an integrated whole rather than as a hodgepodge grouping of discrete components.

Michael Trei  |  Jan 18, 2005  |  Published: Jan 19, 2005  |  0 comments
Can more really give you more?

I've always been a sucker for simplicity. Whether it's the functional beauty of a Mies van der Rohe building or a diesel-engine Mercedes-Benz with a manual-shift transmission, the "less is more" concept has always made sense to me. Unnecessary complexity often does little more than dilute a design's original functionality. This way of thinking has also been used in high-end hi-fi design, with some designers on the tweakier fringe embracing concepts like ultra-simple single-ended tube amplifiers and single-driver loudspeakers. Simple designs like these often have a straightforward clarity to their sound; each time you introduce new elements in order to make something play louder, higher, or deeper, you risk losing some of that clarity in the process.

Michael Trei  |  Sep 18, 2004  |  Published: Sep 01, 2004  |  1 comments
Trickle-down economics, audio style.

While those on the left and right sides of the political fence are bound to debate the pros and cons of trickle-down economic theory for the rest of time, it's hard to deny the way in which many high-tech developments that began life in projects bearing stratospheric price tags eventually came to benefit the masses, in products we can use every day. Today, many of us can afford gadgets like GPS navigation systems and laser pointers, whereas a few years ago this type of technology was available only to the largest institutions and military powers. This access to technology has had a major effect on today's audio components; for example, most of the latest surround processors have far more computing power than the in-flight computer used for the Apollo 11 moon landing in 1969.

Pages