Ken C. Pohlmann

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Ken C. Pohlmann  |  Aug 19, 2003  |  0 comments

Ilustrations by Gary Locke Do you really care? - about home-entertainment gear, that is. If you're only browsing through this issue in the doctor's waiting room, it might be low on your list.

Ken C. Pohlmann  |  Apr 05, 2005  |  0 comments
A surround sound receiver has a lot in common with a boat anchor. They are both formidably large, usually painted black, and heavy - the heavier, the better.
Ken C. Pohlmann  |  Nov 02, 2011  |  0 comments

Clearly, everything is spinning out of control. More specifically, the End of Days has finally arrived. Exactly as predicted in the Bible, we're seeing foul and loathsome sores, water turned to blood, scorching sun and intense heat, total darkness and great pain, and preparations for the final battle between good and evil.

Ken C. Pohlmann  |  Dec 30, 2010  |  0 comments

Blu-ray players are changing — and your HDTV might not like it. However, if your TV has an HDMI input, and it’s HDCP-compliant, you don’t need to read any further. You have nothing to worry about. This article doesn’t concern you. Put down the magazine and do something else just as constructive, like, oh, I don’t know — how about you go check your car’s windshield-washer fluid. . .?

Ken C. Pohlmann  |  Apr 11, 2013  |  0 comments

The JBL name is among the most revered in the audio marketplace. Since its founding in 1946 by James Bullough (love that middle name) Lansing, the brand consistently stood for excellence in the pro market. The company has been part of the Harman constellation for 40 years, and expanded into the consumer market, but its reputation has held fast. Now, JBL is pressing hard in the portable speaker and dock markets. Does the red square still stand for quality?

Ken C. Pohlmann  |  Dec 05, 2007  |  0 comments
Onkyo TX-SR605 receiver 751398007583 Onkyo TX-SR605 The question I get asked the most often: "Which speakers should I buy?" My answer is frustratingly subjective: Buy whatever sounds best to you.
Ken C. Pohlmann  |  Feb 02, 2012  |  0 comments

“There was of course no way of knowing whether you were being watched at any given moment. . . . But at any rate, they could plug into your wire whenever they wanted to.”

Ken C. Pohlmann  |  Sep 02, 2008  |  0 comments

Audiophiles laughed when the CD was first marketed as "Perfect sound forever." They rejected the notion that digital was better than analog, or that the CD sounded better than the LP. Today, it's generally accepted that 44.1-kHz, 16-bit files (with modern improvements such as noise shaping) can challenge the ability of most listeners to detect aural format flaws.

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