HOME MOVIE THEATERS

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Kim Wilson  |  Oct 15, 2008  |  2 comments

Offering up one of the more unique solutions for concealing a projection screen, Beamax has introduced the X-series Dellegno, which allows an 80-inch screen to ascend vertically from the stylish and contemporary cabinet, transforming a room-friendly piece of furniture into a large screen experience.

Kim Wilson  |  Oct 08, 2008  |  0 comments

VUDU Inc., has unveiled HDX, a high definition video format that delivers full HD 1080p material using the company's existing set-top box. Content is delivered over the Internet and optimized for 40 inch and larger HDTVs. According to VUDU, the HDX content is the highest quality available from any Internet, broadcast, cable, or satellite on-demand service. HDX movies are available to all VUDU customers and will be rented for the same price as standard HD titles.

Kim Wilson  |  Sep 30, 2008  |  1 comments

Integra is the first manufacturer to offer Imaging Science Foundation's Certified Calibration Controls (ISFccc), which provides a simplified facilitation of individual calibration for different video sources. The Integra DHC-9.9 ($2000) is the first preamp/controller to include this technology (along with 2 new Integra AVRs) that ensures optimal image quality for every HDMI video input.

Jamie Sorcher, Photos Neil Wilson  |  Aug 25, 2008  |  0 comments

<I>A home with historic heritage goes high tech.</I>

Blake Jochum  |  Feb 20, 2008  |  6 comments

<I>An installer tackles his own home, including the attic.</I>

Steve Guttenberg  |  Feb 05, 2008  |  467 comments
When it comes to home theaters, I thought I'd seen it all. But nothing's come close to this. First, I'm going to try to describe the sheer magnitude of Jeremy Kipnis' theater. His Stewart Snowmatte laboratory-grade screen is the biggest I've ever seen in a home, and in the back of the theater, there's a Sony ultra-high-resolution (4,096-by-2,160) SRX-S110 digital projector. I'm looking everywhere, jotting down questions, and Kipnis sounds almost giddy talking about his theater's capabilities. He refers to his baby, the Kipnis Studio Standard (KSS), as "The Greatest Show on Earth." And from the looks of it, he may be right.
Ray Coronado  |  Feb 04, 2008  |  10 comments

<I>We wired the room, installed the equipment, and calibrated the system ourselves&mdash;and we couldn't be prouder.</I>

Kim Wilson  |  Jan 28, 2008  |  0 comments
How to make your system last.

There has never been a greater abundance of choices, from flat-panel TVs to portable media devices. However, figuring out what to buy is more complicated and confusing than ever. It's not just the myriad of choices in any given product category that's baffling, but also the uncertainty over whether it's going to be obsolete this time next year, or even next month. So, how can you make the best decisions and future-proof your A/V purchases?

Russ Klass  |  Jan 21, 2008  |  5 comments

<I>How I got a great basement home theater&mdash;without breaking the bank. </I>

Darryl Wilkinson  |  Dec 21, 2007  |  6 comments

<I>Trying to build the perfect home theater isn't easy, but it sure is worth it.</I>

Krissy Rushing  |  Dec 20, 2007  |  5 comments

<I>Actor Donnie Wahlberg is not opposed to bringing his work home with him to this sleek, simple, high-performance home theater.</I>

Peter Tribeman  |  Dec 17, 2007  |  0 comments
Part II: Choosing your demo material.

Pulling off a killer demo is definitely fun, but it's also a lot of work. You now have to wear the hats of producer, director, and, of course, editor. Before selecting a demo for a show, we, in the industry, review countless movies and scenes to find something that fits all of the criteria for a great demo listed below.

Krissy Rushing  |  Dec 10, 2007  |  3 comments

<I>A theater in Birmingham, Michigan, straddles the line between professional digital cinema and home theater.</I>

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