LATEST ADDITIONS

Geoffrey Morrison  |  Sep 30, 2005  |  0 comments
More TV than you can shake a really, really big stick at.

You know what? This is a big TV—deceptively big. The cabinet that surrounds the screen is so thin that, at first glance, the display doesn't appear that large. In our studio, it's sitting next to a 55-inch display that I'm reviewing for an upcoming issue, and it is positively dwarfed by the 70-inch JVC. Compared with a 50-inch plasma, which would be a fair comparison from a price standpoint, the HD-70G886 has nearly twice the overall screen area, and it has almost three times the area of a 42-inch display. Kinda makes you want to second-guess that plasma purchase, doesn't it?

Adrienne Maxwell  |  Sep 30, 2005  |  0 comments
Out with the old, in with the Nu.

This is an interesting time for display manufacturers. On the one hand, the HD and flat-panel revolutions have energized the market. People are truly excited to buy TVs again. On the other hand, competition is fierce. It seems like a new TV manufacturer pops up every day to capitalize on the flat-panel frenzy.

Chris Lewis  |  Sep 30, 2005  |  0 comments
Infinity comes through again.

When it comes to expectations, setting the bar high can be a double-edged sword. On the one hand, you can't establish credibility or customer loyalty without coming through time and time again. On the other hand, the higher you set the bar, the easier it is to go down rather than up. Infinity quickly comes to my mind as one of the companies that isn't afraid of this challenge, whether it be with a $500 speaker or a $5,000 speaker. No reviewer can ever predict how tuned his ear will be to a particular set of speakers, or even a brand. However, with Infinity, you can count on getting a well-designed, well-built speaker from a company that has the right priorities in mind. Some speaker manufacturers get it, and some don't. Infinity is clearly one that does.

Chris Lewis  |  Sep 30, 2005  |  0 comments
Power that will surely register on your Richter scale.

Earthquake is not a bad moniker to have attached to an amplifier that can crank out some 300 watts across each of its seven channels. That kind of power, with the right speakers in front of it, can certainly set your listening room to rolling and rumbling. The name also applies well to the minor seismic event that will result when you drop this 122-pound behemoth into your equipment rack—assuming that you have an equipment rack that can hold it. But, as endearing as weight and power are in an amplifier, they don't tell the whole story of an amplifier's potential. Finesse and athleticism are just as important in a big, bulky amplifier as they are in a big, bulky linebacker.

 |  Sep 28, 2005  |  0 comments

Intel and Microsoft announced Monday that they have joined the HD DVD Promotion Group, citing the Toshiba-led format's "unique advantages, including PC and connected device interoperability and an easy, affordable transition to high definition for consumers."

Fred Manteghian  |  Sep 26, 2005  |  0 comments

Too long have young men lusted for the thrill of the in-home big screen, only to be rebuked by the financial concerns of their astringent significant others. Thank ya' Jesus for dropping projector prices! Not so much that projector manufacturers figure out that they're not making any money and am-scray, but enough to keep enlarging the population of true believers. It's an exciting time for home theater aficionados and the InFocus ScreenPlay 7210 is here to save the day.

Thomas J. Norton  |  Sep 25, 2005  |  0 comments

While we've all been happily watching our 1280x720 digital video displays, manufacturers have been quietly working behind the scenes to bring us 1920x1080. Every display technology, it seems, has its own higher resolution displays in development. Some are even in stores as I write.

Steven Stone  |  Sep 25, 2005  |  0 comments

<B>Electronics</B>
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<I>by Steven Stone</I>

 |  Sep 25, 2005  |  0 comments

Verizon began taking orders late last week for its FiOS fiber optic TV service, beginning a rollout that will cost the telecommunications company billions and have it competing directly with cable and satellite operators for your TV subscription dollars.

 |  Sep 22, 2005  |  0 comments

Consumer electronics giant Sony today announced a major restructuring that will cut 10,000 jobs from its global work force, close nearly a dozen manufacturing plants and will downsize or terminate as many as 15 unprofitable business categories.

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