Mark Fleischmann

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
Mark Fleischmann Posted: Apr 18, 2008 0 comments
Long-suffering New York City cable customers will soon have a new option when Verizon offers its FiOS fiber-optic TV delivery technology to all five of the city's boroughs. Yes, that means you, Brooklyn! And you too, Queens! And the Bronx, Staten Island, and Manhattan. Verizon scores five apples.
Filed under
Mark Fleischmann Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments
To whet consumer interest in music downloads, and celebrate the release of the LG chocolate phone, Verizon has eliminated the monthly fee previously levied for its Vcast Music store. When the service made its debut last year, users had to pay a $15/month charge in addition to per-track charges. Now you can buy the hip chocolate phone and pay for songs by the track, period. The chocolate phone costs $150 and another $100 will buy you a 2GB mini-SD memory card to store music and photos. Music costs $1.99 per track, but you're allowed to download each one twice, once on the phone and once on your PC. The $1.99 may seem a little steep compared to iTunes, but Sprint Nextel charges an even stiffer $2.50 per track. Vcast downloads come in the Windows Media Player format, with DRM, of course. Bumping unfettered MP3 files from PC to phone was impossible when V Cast made its debut in January, but Verizon insisted that this was purely a software hurdle, and you're now free to load the phone with MP3s.
Filed under
Mark Fleischmann Posted: Aug 15, 2006 3 comments
We control the horizontal. We control the vertical. And we control the DVR, says Verizon. If you're a multi-zone kind of consumer, and interested in Verizon's FiOS TV service, check out the Verizon Home Media DVR. In a multi-zone DVR configuration, the Motorola QIP6416—shown here—acts as the media hub, recording and streaming video. It has a 160GB hard drive and dual QAM tuners. Operating as remote terminal is the Motorola QIP2500 set-top box. The remote terminal operates in standard-def only, though you can watch high-def on the hub DVR. Media Manager software pulls photos and music from a PC and routes them to connected TVs. The Home Media DVR costs $19.95 per month ($7 more than a regular Verizon DVR) plus $3.95 for each remote-terminal STB. The relatively new concept of place-shifting has not come without controversy among content producers. Cablevision's network DVR has become the first casualty and the Slingbox may follow.
Filed under
Mark Fleischmann Posted: Aug 14, 2008 0 comments
Verizon and Intel have asked the Federal Communications Commission to mandate ethernet ports in video devices.
Filed under
Mark Fleischmann Posted: Dec 11, 2008 0 comments
What's that gutteral oinking and snorting sound? That's the sound of a video game console at the energy trough. Leave the console on and you might add more than a hundred bucks a year to your power bill.
Filed under
Mark Fleischmann Posted: Feb 22, 2007 0 comments
Sawbones who play video games regularly are 37 percent less likely to make a mistake when doing something in your gut with a pointed object, according to a survey of surgeons at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Of 33 surgeons who participated in the study, nine had played video games for at least three hours in the preceding week, and 15 had never played them at all. Those nine were golden: Not only did they make fewer errors, they also performed 27 percent faster, and scored 42 percent higher in a surgical-skills test. The technique in question is laparoscopic surgery, in which a video camera on a stick is inserted into the patient's body, allowing for smaller incisions for the other sharp objects and less invasive procedures overall. "It's like tying your shoelaces with three-foot-long chopsticks," says the author of the study, Dr. James "Butch" Rosser. Yup, he's a gamer: "I use the same hand-eye coordination to play video games as I use for surgery." Maybe we shouldn't worry so much about video-game violence. This guy's itchy trigger finger is saving lives.
Filed under
Mark Fleischmann Posted: Jul 28, 2010 0 comments
Video streaming has grown from an emerging category of program delivery to an option enjoyed by the majority of Netflix subscribers. And for TV addicts, the selection of shows from various online sources is near comprehensive.
Filed under
Mark Fleischmann Posted: Jan 07, 2011 0 comments
The Principal Grand subwoofer from Vienna Acoustics packs a 12-inch pulp-carbon driver into an enclosure with two separate chambers for the 300-watt amp and crossover. The latter, as shown in the pic, is on the bottom. The company, which actually manufactures in Vienna, is fussy about its drivers, in this case source from ScanSpeak because it's important for a sub "to play more than one note." Amen. Pricing ranges from $3000-4000 depending on finish. Also shown was the Strauss Series In-Waltz in-wall speaker, with features derived from an on-wall cousin.
Filed under
Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 27, 2006 0 comments
The rap against the video iPod is that the screen is too small for movie immersion or even music-video amusement. Well, it was only a matter of time until someone came up with a video docking station, and Viewsonic has done it. The Apple-authorized "made for iPod" ViewDock comes in sizes of 23 and 19 inches, suitable for desktop, dorm, or space-starved studio apartment. Viewsonic's press release does not disclose resolution, though iTunes video downloads max out at standard-def 640 by 480, so a livingroom-worthy high-def ViewDock remains just an aspiration. The ViewDock will hit Europe, Taiwan, and—yesss!—the United States in November (otherwise I wouldn't have bothered to report it). Price is yet to be determined.
Filed under
Mark Fleischmann Posted: Jun 17, 2008 0 comments
There are so many ways to track the resurgence of vinyl. You might read Michael Fremer's "Analog Corner" column in the print version of Stereophile, our sister publication, or his own site The Music Angle. Or you could read the recent series of blogs by Stephen Mejias about his sudden and intense immersion in record cleaning machines and all things analog. You might peruse this masters thesis by a student at the University of Amsterdam. And what's this? A turntable review in Home Theater Magazine! But my favorite recent clip is this Associated Press story about a retail chain that accidentally ordered a large shipment of vinyl and ended up selling it.

Pages

X
Enter your Sound & Vision username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading