Mark Fleischmann

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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Mar 29, 2007 1 comments
Arguably one of the biggest tech stories of our lifetimes is the transformation of telephone companies into full-service providers of television, internet, and phone service. The latest news is that Verizon is making this transformation much faster than AT&T. Verizon has signed up 207,000 subscribers for its FiOS service while AT&T's U-verse lags behind at 10,000 (a figure the company is actually bragging about!). This isn't a direct competition because their service areas don't overlap. Verizon serves northeastern and mid-Atlantic states while AT&T dominates the south, the midwest, and part of the west coast. There is, however, a struggle between two visions: Verizon's, which brings fiber right to your doorstep, and AT&T's, a hybrid that uses old copper wiring for the last mile. Verizon is pressing its point with the announcement that FiOS network speeds will multiply by four to eight times with the implementation of GPON (gigabyte passive optical network) technology from Alcatel-Lucent. When I visited Verizon last year, I was told GPON would enable delivery of as many as three simultaneous HD signals by 2007-08.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Jun 22, 2010 0 comments
Thinking of signing up for Verizon's FiOS fiber optic TV, internet, and phone service? The company now offers a new incentive: You can get the service on a month-to-month basis, with no contract and no termination fee.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Jul 06, 2007 0 comments
Starting on July 1, all non-broadcast television providers are required under federal law to support the CableCARD standard and storebought cable boxes--with very few exceptions. One of those exceptions is Verizon.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Jan 26, 2006 12 comments
Possibly the hottest story in home theater is the rollout of video-delivery services from the telcos. AT&T is just getting started while Verizon is going strong. Verizon has just announced that its bleeding-edge FiOS TV service will make its debut in Massapequa, New York and Woburn, Massachusetts. It's already available in parts of Texas, Florida, and Virginia. Eventually it will reach half the states in Verizon's service area with the addition of California, Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Maryland, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Washington. FiOS TV is 100 percent fiber, piped right into your home, and it's just one facet of Verizon's longterm plan to upgrade all its copper lines (someday) to fiber optics. The cost is $34.95 per month for 180 channels. If you want to receive 20 HD channels, add $9.95 for the HD set-top box, bringing the total to $44.90. The triple-play package with TV, net access, and phone service comes to $104.85 (again, add $9.95 for HD). Keep a vigil at the external link below for availability in your area.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Mar 31, 2010 0 comments
Verizon will slow the rollout of its FiOS fiber optic video/internet/phone service, creating winners and losers in its service area. Among the winners are New York City, Washington DC, and Philadelphia, where existing projects will be completed. But FiOS will not be coming to Baltimore, downtown Boston, and other areas.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Apr 18, 2008 0 comments
Long-suffering New York City cable customers will soon have a new option when Verizon offers its FiOS fiber-optic TV delivery technology to all five of the city's boroughs. Yes, that means you, Brooklyn! And you too, Queens! And the Bronx, Staten Island, and Manhattan. Verizon scores five apples.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments
To whet consumer interest in music downloads, and celebrate the release of the LG chocolate phone, Verizon has eliminated the monthly fee previously levied for its Vcast Music store. When the service made its debut last year, users had to pay a $15/month charge in addition to per-track charges. Now you can buy the hip chocolate phone and pay for songs by the track, period. The chocolate phone costs $150 and another $100 will buy you a 2GB mini-SD memory card to store music and photos. Music costs $1.99 per track, but you're allowed to download each one twice, once on the phone and once on your PC. The $1.99 may seem a little steep compared to iTunes, but Sprint Nextel charges an even stiffer $2.50 per track. Vcast downloads come in the Windows Media Player format, with DRM, of course. Bumping unfettered MP3 files from PC to phone was impossible when V Cast made its debut in January, but Verizon insisted that this was purely a software hurdle, and you're now free to load the phone with MP3s.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Aug 15, 2006 3 comments
We control the horizontal. We control the vertical. And we control the DVR, says Verizon. If you're a multi-zone kind of consumer, and interested in Verizon's FiOS TV service, check out the Verizon Home Media DVR. In a multi-zone DVR configuration, the Motorola QIP6416—shown here—acts as the media hub, recording and streaming video. It has a 160GB hard drive and dual QAM tuners. Operating as remote terminal is the Motorola QIP2500 set-top box. The remote terminal operates in standard-def only, though you can watch high-def on the hub DVR. Media Manager software pulls photos and music from a PC and routes them to connected TVs. The Home Media DVR costs $19.95 per month ($7 more than a regular Verizon DVR) plus $3.95 for each remote-terminal STB. The relatively new concept of place-shifting has not come without controversy among content producers. Cablevision's network DVR has become the first casualty and the Slingbox may follow.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Aug 14, 2008 0 comments
Verizon and Intel have asked the Federal Communications Commission to mandate ethernet ports in video devices.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Dec 11, 2008 0 comments
What's that gutteral oinking and snorting sound? That's the sound of a video game console at the energy trough. Leave the console on and you might add more than a hundred bucks a year to your power bill.

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