LATEST ADDITIONS

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SV Staff Posted: Mar 23, 2017 0 comments
Mario’s iOS honeymoon is over. Nintendo’s iconic videogame character makes his debut on Android devices today in Super Mario Run, more than three months after he first skipped his way onto iOS.
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Al Griffin Posted: Mar 23, 2017 0 comments
Got a tech question for Sound & Vision? Email us at AskSandV@gmail.com

Q Are any of the new Ultra HDTVs coming out 3D-compatible? I don’t want my 3D Blu-ray disc collection to become an unusable relic. —Don Fowler

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SV Staff Posted: Mar 23, 2017 0 comments
Sublime With Rome, a collaboration between Eric Wilson, formerly of the band Sublime, and singer and guitarist Rome Ramirez, has announced that it will release a limited-edition 12-inch vinyl album of recent unreleased demos on April 22 to celebrate with Record Store Day 2017.
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Barb Gonzalez Posted: Mar 22, 2017 1 comments
Apple is finally getting around to allowing users to rent a video once and watch it on all devices. I took the new feature for a test drive.
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Mike Mettler Posted: Mar 22, 2017 0 comments
Chilly Gonzales (seated) and Jarvis Cocker. Courtesy of Deutsche Grammophon.

Let us now give praise to the power of the almighty song cycle that comprises Room 29, a decidedly thrilling 16-track treatise jointly concocted by vocalist/lyricist Jarvis Cocker (of Pulp fame) and composer/pianist Chilly Gonzales (Feist, Peaches, Daft Punk) in and around a baby grand piano located in the same-numbered room on the second floor of the famed Chateau Marmont Hotel on Sunset Boulevard in West Hollywood. Gonzales called in from his room across the Pond to discuss the sonics of Room 29, his and Cocker’s “reverse” song-cycle writing process, and how (yes) Gilligan’s Island fits into the middle of it all.

SV Staff Posted: Mar 22, 2017 0 comments
Denon has announced plans to expand its Heos line of wireless multiroom audio products with a soundbar and subwoofer that will be available in April.
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SV Staff Posted: Mar 22, 2017 0 comments
When does technology go too far? It’s a question that comes up frequently these days. Here’s one potential example.
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SV Staff Posted: Mar 22, 2017 0 comments
The UHD Alliance (UHDA) recently announced the Mobile HDR Premium specification for laptops, notebooks, tablets, and smartphones to confirm that a portable device meets UHDA-defined performance criteria for 4K/Ultra HD resolution, dynamic range, color space, and bit depth.
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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Mar 21, 2017 2 comments
I was midway through a long delayed reorganization, riffling through piles of as yet to be filed home- and work-related stuff. As anyone can tell you, when you start to clear out documents and publications you haven’t seen in years you’re constantly tempted to stop and re-read much of it, which inevitably brings the entire process to a screeching halt.

Rather than keep entire audio-video magazines beyond about three years (the growth of the Internet is making even that a dubious practice), I tend to tear out articles that might be of value in the future. That was how I came across an article I hadn’t seen in 22 years. Titled “Subwoofer Secrets” (the inspiration for the name of this blog) and penned by the late Tom Nousaine, it had been published in the January 1995 issue of Stereo Review, the latter a distant godfather of Sound & Vision.

David Vaughn Posted: Mar 21, 2017 1 comments

AT527NC Amplifier
Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value

AT524NC Amplifier
Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $3,695, $2,595

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Very powerful
Natural and balanced
Made in the U.S.A.
Minus
LEDs are too bright

THE VERDICT
The days of looking down on Class D amps are over.

Two and a half years ago, I reviewed my first ATI amplifier, and to say I was impressed would be an understatement. The ATI Signature AT6005 five-channel amp set a new benchmark for its designer, Morris Kessler—to the point where he put his John Hancock on the faceplate.

Last year, S&V editor-at-large Bob Ankosko sat down with Kessler to talk about his design philosophy over the years, and the subject of Class D amps was broached. Kessler mentioned that his current designs were all Class A/B, but he was following the developments of Class D very closely—though the initial efforts in this area didn’t meet his high standards because frequency response varied greatly as the impedance of the speaker changed. He hinted at the time that he may have finally found a Class D solution that he could deem acceptable, which turned out to be the latest Hypex Ncore modules.

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