AUDIO VIDEO NEWS

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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Jan 27, 2011 6 comments
Even while Netflix has passed the 20 million mark in subscribers, some Netflixers are pleading for a disc-only rental plan.

"If you don't want instant gratification, then there should be an option -- call it the slow lane, if you like," said a blogger quoted in Home Media Magazine. In the wake of recent Netflix disc-rental price increases, an online poll showed 10 percent threatening to ax their membership. That probably won't cut much ice with Netflix, which sees its future in streaming, even to the point of removing "Add to DVD Queue" from its streaming interface.

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SV Staff Posted: Apr 24, 2008 0 comments
Netflix just announced they'll soon begin charging an extra premium to subscribers who want access to Blu-ray rentals. Now, I'm a Netflix fan from way back - one of the first to write about it in the mags. Still on the 4 disc/month plan (and my...
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Barry Willis Posted: Aug 22, 1998 0 comments

Convergence might be the brunt of jokes in some quarters, but not at 7 Mark Drive in San Rafael, CA. That's the home of <A HREF="http://www.net-tv.net/">NetTV</A>, which has just announced its new ExtremeDVD home-entertainment system. ExtremeDVD is optimized for 3-D gaming, Internet access, satellite downloads, and high-resolution movie playback.

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Posted: Feb 09, 2003 0 comments

Executives from four major television networks are backing a legislative tax proposal that would help minority companies first entering the broadcasting arena.

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Mark Fleischmann Posted: May 19, 2010 0 comments
Cablevision's network DVR, long delayed by court battles with the entertainment industry, finally reached some homes in April, having cleared its final legal hurdles.
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Jon Iverson Posted: Sep 06, 1998 0 comments

Most folks in the US take it for granted that they can easily watch broadcasts from networks like CBS, NBC, ABC, and Fox. But let's say you live in the Oregon hills, about 45 miles from the nearest major city. You've never been able to receive a decent television signal with an antenna, and cable hasn't come within miles of your house. If you want to watch network TV, that new direct broadcast satellite (DBS) dish on your roof is the only option you've got. Due to a recent injunction, however, that option might soon expire.

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Posted: Apr 05, 2007 0 comments

HD DVD might be taking another leap ahead on the interactivity front. The most recent firmware update for Toshiba's first-gen HD DVD players adds "support for certain anticipated network delivered content in future HD DVD discs." Those of you who can get your HD-A1 or HD -XA1 player to an Ethernet connection can download the update from the 'Net, or you can contact Toshiba to get the update on a disc.

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SV Staff Posted: Feb 09, 2009 0 comments
 Sleek and shiny new LG Blu-ray players will be hitting the shelves, but only in Japan. The BD370 is a networked Blu-ray player, with BD-Live and YouTube support. Alas, no Netflix, no CinemaNow. For now. Set for a Q2 release in Japan,...
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Barry Willis Posted: Jun 28, 1998 0 comments

Move over, fiber optics; good-bye, T1 lines. The unexploited potential of ordinary copper telephone wires will soon be mined by a consortium of computer and communications companies. Known as the Home Phoneline Networking Alliance (or HomePNA), the recently formed group intends to deliver affordable, high-speed networking over existing phone lines.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Jun 09, 2002 0 comments

Only a few short years ago, home networking was heralded as an inevitability, with manufacturers and research groups rushing to establish standards and technologies for new, connected products. But as the battle for the living room heats up, a recent study suggests that more than half of tech-savvy consumers in the US are currently indifferent to the benefits that a networked home might offer.

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Barry Willis Posted: Oct 03, 1998 0 comments

Where do captains of industry go when their cash cows begin to produce sour milk? To Washington DC, where they beg for regulatory intervention. That's where CBS Station Group Manager Mel Kazmarin was last week, and that's what he was doing---asking the Federal Communications Commission to reconsider its prohibition against one TV network owning more than 35% of the available commercial broadcast stations in the country.

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Barry Willis Posted: Jan 16, 2000 0 comments

A war of words has broken out between television networks <A HREF="http://www.nbc.com/">NBC</A> and <A HREF="http://cbs.com/">CBS</A> over the use of digital effects that altered the background during CBS coverage of New Year's Eve festivities in New York's Times Square. "Shocked and outraged" is one of the milder phrases used by NBC executives over the use of digital effects by CBS technicians to block a huge NBC video sign visible behind newsman Dan Rather during the broadcast. A CBS logo was inserted in its place.

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Posted: Sep 01, 2002 0 comments

The fall television season will be more high definition intensive than ever, thanks to a beefed-up HDTV schedule from ABC and CBS.

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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Feb 06, 2009 0 comments
Several major TV networks have announced that they plan for their owned affiliate stations to keep analog signals on the airwaves until the final deadline in June.
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Barry Willis Posted: Mar 21, 1999 0 comments

According to the March 15 edition of <A HREF="http://www.wsj.com/">The Wall Street Journal</A>, satellite broadcaster <A HREF="http://www.directv.com/">DirecTV</A> will stop beaming network signals to ineligible customers and offer to install terrestrial antennas at a discount as part of an agreement reached with several TV networks. The satellite service has been <A HREF="http://www.guidetohometheater.com/shownews.cgi?239">wrangling</A> with four major networks---ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox---over rights to deliver network programming to customers in areas served by local broadcasters.

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