LATEST ADDITIONS

Al Griffin Posted: Jun 26, 2001 0 comments

Television is something we all know and love -- sometimes without good reason. Critics routinely argue that shows like Temptation Island and WWF Smackdown! have pushed us several steps down the evolutionary ladder, but people still watch them. One thing that has evolved is the technology for displaying video images.

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SV Staff Posted: Jun 26, 2001 0 comments

JVC

Prep for the future with JVC's RX-9010VBK digital surround receiver. Rated to deliver 120 watts to each of five channels, it has such forward-looking features as a front-panel USB port and an extended frequency response, rated from 7 Hz to 50 kHz ±3 dB, to handle the wider bandwidth of DVD-Audio.

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HT Staff Posted: Jun 26, 2001 0 comments
The quality of electrical power is often the limiting factor for high performance audio and video systems. Many manufacturers have attempted to address this limitation---caused in large part by electromagnetic interference (EMI) and radio frequency interference (RFI)---by designing and marketing surge protectors, AC line filters, uninterruptible power supplies, and various sorts of AC enhancers and generators. Many of these solutions are bulky, expensive, or only partially effective.
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HT Staff Posted: Jun 26, 2001 0 comments
The surround processor is the heart of every high-end home theater system. Good ones, like Myryad Systems' MDP500, have flexibility built in for unanticipated new formats.
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Jon Iverson Posted: Jun 24, 2001 0 comments

Last week, <A HREF="http://www.st.com">STMicroelectronics</A>, which manufactures semiconductor devices used in set-top boxes (STBs), High Definition Television (HDTV), and other sophisticated digital consumer equipment, announced what it describes as the "world's most advanced chip" for the HDTV market. STM says that the new STi7020 "brings an unprecedented level of integration to the HDTV industry" and adds that the chip is expected to play a key role in the transition from standard definition to HDTV technology.

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Barry Willis Posted: Jun 24, 2001 0 comments

If it were legal, how would you record a high definition television program? High-definition digital video signals propagate at a data rate of 24Mbits/second, a rate that would quickly fill up the approximately five gigabytes of storage available on standard recordable DVDs. That's barely enough to record a half-hour sitcom, if the commercials were deleted.

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Wes Phillips Posted: Jun 24, 2001 0 comments

<I>Ed Harris, Anne Heche, Armin Mueller-Stahl, Michael Rispoli, Charles Haid, James Gallanders. Directed by Agnieszka Holland. Aspect ratios: 1.85:1 (anamorphic), 4:3 (full-screen). Dolby Digital 2.0. 118 minutes. 1999. Sony Pictures Classics 04755. R. $29.95.</I>

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Barry Willis Posted: Jun 24, 2001 0 comments

The cable industry continues to be the major obstacle to expanding the market for digital television (DTV). That's the view of the <A HREF="http://www.ce.org/">Consumer Electronics Association</A>, which in June asked the <A HREF="http://www.fcc.gov">Federal Communications Commission</A> to consider instituting what it termed "a capacity-based dual or multicast cable carriage rule" to encourage the growth of the format.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Jun 24, 2001 0 comments

EchoStar's Mark Jackson puts it succinctly: "Our customers want access to more channels, and they are increasingly demanding bandwidth-intensive HDTV channels." But there is only so much bandwidth available between the satellite in the sky and the dish on the ground, and that bandwidth is carefully divided among channels. The more channels on the system, the less bandwidth available for added features like HDTV.

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