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David Ranada Posted: Jun 07, 2005 0 comments
Download our tables summarizing features and lab results in handy PDF format.

While DVD recorders have a ways to go befo

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user Posted: Jun 07, 2005 0 comments
Sharp is finally ready to begin selling - in Japan, at first, and then in the U.S. later in the year - the LC-65GE1, a jumbo 65V-inch1 LCD flat-panel HDTV, touted by Sharp as "the world's largest LCD model". The new giant HDTV uses a full-spec high-definition low reflection Advanced Super View LCD panel with 1,920 by 1,080 pixels (1080i). Sharp says that high-speed full-motion video artifacts are significantly reduced as a result of Sharp's QS (Quick Shoot) technology. In the new model, crimson has been added to the standard red, green, and blue backlighting in order to recreate previously unreproduceable colors such as "the deep red of aged wine". (No mention was made of the set's ability to accurately reproduce the color of the $3.99 bottle of cheap rose I bought last week, but I guess that's to be expected.) The TV's audio package includes Sharp's 1-Bit Digital Amplifier and bottom-mounted High-Aperture Speaker System.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Jun 07, 2005 0 comments
Following the mantra that bigger is better and flatter is even better, Samsung tantalized flat-panel TV lovers with the announcement that they've developed the world's first 40-inch active matrix OLED display. The prototype panel has a pixel resolution of 1280 x 800 (WXGA for those computer types).
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HT Staff Posted: Jun 06, 2005 0 comments
TAW
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HT Staff Posted: Jun 06, 2005 0 comments
Carlos Franzetti—The Jazz Kamerata (Chesky) [SACD]
By mere coincidence (or perhaps not), I sat down to review this new hybrid SACD on the rare rainy day in Los Angeles (although not quite as rare this winter). The two were a perfect fit. The Jazz Kamerata has a comfortable warmth about it, inviting you to wrap yourself in it and settle in for a lazy afternoon.
Thomas J. Norton Posted: Jun 06, 2005 0 comments

Even as DVI and HDMI were being adopted by video manufacturers as the digital links of choice, one limitation of these connections was already well known: they don't like to be used in long lengths. The generally accepted limit for an unassisted digital video cable of this type is about 5 meters or just over 16 feet, particularly with high-definition sources.

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Robert Deutsch Posted: Jun 06, 2005 0 comments

<I>Jerry Seinfeld, Jason Alexander, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Michael Richards. Aspect ratio: 1.33:1. Dolby Digital 2.0 (English), Dolby Digital 1.0 (French, Spanish). Four discs. 552 minutes. Sony Pictures 09774. NR. $49.95</I>

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Joel Brinkley Posted: Jun 05, 2005 0 comments

<IMG SRC="/images/archivesart/headshot150.jb.jpg" WIDTH=150 HEIGHT=196 HSPACE=6 VSPACE=4 BORDER=0 ALIGN=RIGHT><I>Everyone who visits this site knows that high-definition DVDs are nearly here. Most everyone also knows that, like many great advances in consumer electronics, a format war seems almost certain to doom this one.</I>

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Jun 05, 2005 0 comments

As I mention in <A href="http://www.ultimateavmag.com/scottwilkinson/505sw/">my current column</A>, streaming high-quality A/V content in real time over the Internet is not practical due in part to bandwidth limitations. Currently, DSL and cable modems top out at about 3 megabits per second downstream (into the home), while DVDs typically consume 4-7Mbps of bandwidth, and standard MPEG-2 HDTV requires over 19Mbps.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Jun 01, 2005 Published: Jun 02, 2005 0 comments

In separate line shows held in San Diego and New York, Hitachi announced their new video line last month. Most of the models will begin appearing in stores before the start of the annual fall holiday buying season.

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