LATEST ADDITIONS

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Jon Iverson Posted: Apr 07, 2002 0 comments

One limitation often preventing home theater enthusiasts from installing a front projection video system is the need to place the projector in a particular place in the room to get a proper image on screen. A semiconductor company exhibiting at the National Association of Broadcasters 2002 convention this week in Las Vegas says they can change all that.

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Barry Willis Posted: Apr 07, 2002 0 comments

Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Michael Powell has asked major networks to boost their digital programming to at least 50% of their prime-time schedules for next season. He asked broadcasters in major markets to make sure they can transmit digitally by next January without degrading their analog signals. He also asked electronics manufacturers to include digital tuners in coming generations of television sets—in 36" or larger sets by 2005, in 25" or larger sets by 2006, and in 13" or larger sets by 2007. Tuner requirements have been contested by the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA), which claims that it does not want TV design to be "dictated by Washington."

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Barry Willis Posted: Apr 07, 2002 0 comments

The first week of April was a tumultuous one for <A HREF="http://www.echostar.com">EchoStar</A>. On April 3, the Littleton, CO&ndash;based direct broadcast satellite (DBS) service abruptly announced that it would terminate any further effort to promote Internet access via StarBand Communications, Inc. The next day, the FCC ruled that EchoStar was in violation of federal regulations with its "two-dish" system for delivering local television signals. The week's one bright spot for the service was a settlement with Walt Disney Company that will keep Disney and ABC programming on EchoStar's menu.

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Michael Metzger Posted: Apr 07, 2002 0 comments

<I>Donald Sutherland, Elliott Gould, Tom Skerritt, Sally Kellerman, Robert Duvall, Roger Bowen, Rene Auberjonois, Jo Ann Pflug, Gary Burghoff, Fred Williamson, Bud Cort. Directed by Robert Altman. Aspect ratio: 2.35:1 (anamorphic). Dolby Digital 2.0. Two discs. 116 minutes. 1970. 20th Century Fox 2002709. R. $24.99.</I>

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SV Staff Posted: Apr 02, 2002 0 comments

Wild Blue Yonder Okay, I know I shouldn't gloat. But I told you so. The breathtaking, commercial-free imagery of a packaged HDTV medium would persuade people to watch less broadcast and cable TV. That new medium has arrived.

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Al Griffin Posted: Apr 02, 2002 0 comments

There's no denying that digital high-definition TV (HDTV) is a vast improvement over our old analog TV system, but if you want to record any of the high-def programs delivered over the air by local broadcasters or via satellite from Dish Network or DirecTV, your options are ridiculously limited.

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Brian C. Fenton Posted: Apr 02, 2002 0 comments

Because every new format seems to set off a format war, we were a little surprised when nine major electronics manufacturers announced that they actually agreed on what the next-generation recordable optical-disc format should be.

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Doug Newcomb Posted: Apr 02, 2002 0 comments

Four of Hollywood's home-video heavies - DreamWorks, 20th Century Fox, Artisan Entertainment, and Universal Studios - have thrown their weight behind a format for distributing films in high-definition, the JVC-developed D-Theater variant of D-VHS.

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David Ranada Posted: Apr 02, 2002 0 comments

Okay, I know I shouldn't gloat. But I told you so. In a keynote speech at the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) annual convention a year ago, I warned that if the broadcast and cable industries didn't get their act together when it came to putting high-definition signals out there in a big way, high-def programming would be provided by other means.

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HT Staff Posted: Apr 02, 2002 0 comments
Many home theater fans think all subwoofers are alike.

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