LATEST ADDITIONS

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HT Staff Posted: Jan 30, 2001 0 comments
Just say no to black, brushed aluminum, and dark wood veneers. Tigard, Oregon-based EdgeAudio is betting that movie fans will do exactly that when they seen the company's new line of home theater speaker systems. Conceived by award-winning Ziba Design, EdgeAudio's entire line of home theater speakers and subwoofers will get the color cabinet treatment later this year. Prototypes were displayed at the Consumer Electronics Show in January.
Thomas J. Norton Posted: Jan 29, 2001 0 comments

Sony's first Super Audio CD players were audio-only machines that did not play back DVD-Video discs. Fair enough—those machines were aimed at the top of the high-end audiophile market, and were priced accordingly. But with the DVP-S9000ES—the first DVD player to carry Sony's upscale "ES" badge—we have not only a first-class SACD player, but one priced within the reach of many home-theater enthusiasts.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Jan 29, 2001 0 comments

When a speaker company changes hands, particularly when it is sold by its founders, a new design team often comes on board. That can be a tricky affair. Like passing a baton in a relay race, if it's not handled smoothly, or if it's dropped, sometimes there's no catching up and the race is lost. That almost happened to giant Harman International when it bought Infinity from Arnie Nudell and Cary Christie. Both men ultimately left to pursue other ventures. It took years for Infinity to fully regain its footing, which it did with the rollout of the outstanding, high-tech Prelude system, reviewed by Joel Brinkley in the July/August 2000 issue of SGHT.

Thomas J. Norton Posted: Jan 29, 2001 0 comments

It's that time of year again. 2000 is history. As we enter a new millennium (I know, I know, you thought you did that last year), we take the time to look back and decide on the products that most impressed us in Y2K. True to the title of the award, all of the <I>Guide</I>'s editors were surveyed for their opinions, particularly in categories where the race was close.

Michael Fremer Posted: Jan 29, 2001 0 comments

Because of manufacturing and publishing lead times, Christmas-season products are shown in June. That's when I had my first encounter with the Philips 55PP9701&mdash;at a line show, a press event at which a company shows its entire line of new products. There the 55PP9701 was, along with Philips' new light bulbs, shavers, blood-pressure monitors, and budget-priced A/V receivers.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Jan 28, 2001 0 comments

Last week, several companies announced what they describe as a "unique, innovative project which will demonstrate the future of home entertainment." The project, named "CompleteTV," is intended to enable 20 families in Raleigh, North Carolina to take part in a pilot program beginning during the second quarter of 2001, giving them access to a home entertainment "experience" which will attempt to combine the worlds of broadcast HD programming and Internet-based information and entertainment.

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Barry Willis Posted: Jan 28, 2001 0 comments

Want to build a <I>real</I> home theater? With a film projector and a really huge screen? You may get your chance to buy some excellent theater equipment at bargain prices in the coming months. Hundreds of theaters nationwide will be closed to cope with the current oversupply, according to January announcements from some of the biggest theater operators in the US.

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Posted: Jan 28, 2001 0 comments

Sunday, January 28 is notable for being Super Bowl Sunday, arguably the biggest US holiday. It's also a significant date in the development of high definition television, because it is the first day that a local broadcaster began airing news shot, edited, and played back on HD equipment.

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Posted: Jan 28, 2001 0 comments

Speaking last week at a meeting of the Association of Local Television Stations (ALTV) in Las Vegas, <A HREF="http://www.ce.org">Consumer Electronics Association</A>'s Gary Shapiro announced that actual unit sales to dealers (not to end consumers) of digital television (DTV) displays and integrated sets reached 648,429 in 2000, surpassing earlier industry estimates and accounting for $1.4 billion. Shapiro says that these figures represent more than 400% growth over 1999 sales. In addition, 36,794 stand-alone set-top receivers were sold to dealers in 2000, says Shapiro.

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Barry Willis Posted: Jan 28, 2001 0 comments

Direct satellite broadcaster <A HREF="http://www.directv.com/">DirecTV</A> has gone on the offensive against piracy by unplugging freeloaders and by installing copy protection circuitry in its latest set-top boxes.

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