LATEST ADDITIONS

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Jon Iverson Posted: Nov 19, 2000 0 comments

While computer makers are still struggling to find consensus for the recordable DVD format, with the front-running rivals DVD-RW and DVD-RAM duking it out, a few consumer electronics products incorporating DVD-R are beginning to appear. Last week, <A HREF="http://www.toshiba.com/">Toshiba</A> announced its introduction of the RD-2000, which it describes as "the world's first combination of hard disk drive and DVD-RAM video recorder" for recording TV programs. The new recorder is planned for sale in the Japanese market only, starting December 22.

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Barry Willis Posted: Nov 19, 2000 0 comments

The wearisome chicken-or-egg debate over the rollout of digital television went another round last week, as television manufacturers appealed to the <A HREF="http://www.fcc.gov/">Federal Communications Commission</A> to require more digital programming from broadcasters.

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Posted: Nov 19, 2000 0 comments

Last week, <A HREF="http://www.yamaha.com/yec/index1.htm">Yamaha</A>, traditionally known to American consumers as a specialist in audio equipment, announced that it will enter the home entertainment projector market. The first offering in Yamaha's new product line is a high-resolution projector, based on <A HREF="http://www.dlp.com">Digital Light Processing</A> (DLP) technology and intended for home theater use. Yamaha says that the projector is due to be released next spring.

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Barry Willis Posted: Nov 19, 2000 0 comments

Add this to your list of fading artifacts of the 20th century: bulky reels of film delivered to theaters by truck. Digital video satellite feeds are destined to replace shipments of physical product.

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Posted: Nov 12, 2000 0 comments

Convergence is more than a buzzword in the minds of the engineers at <A HREF="http://www.hauppauge.com/"> Hauppauge Digital, Inc</A>. The New York electronics manufacturer has announced what it is calling "the first personal video recorder for PCs." In development for eighteen months, the WinTV-PVR is built to occupy a single PCI slot, and allows the recording and playback of television programs via computer. The device is compatible with Microsoft Windows 98 and Windows ME, and comes bundled with a remote control and an FM receiver for the PC.

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HT Staff Posted: Nov 12, 2000 0 comments
You want brightness? Toshiba's got it. The company's new X-Series LCD multimedia projectors produce up to 2400 ANSI lumens, bright enough to create startling images in well-lit rooms.
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Joe Leydon Posted: Nov 12, 2000 0 comments

D<I>enis Leary, Billy Crudup, Ian Hart, Jason Barry, Famke Janssen, Colm Meaney, Martin Sheen, Jeanne Tripplehorn, Noah Emmerich, John Diehl. Directed by Ted Demme. Aspect ratio: 1.85:1 (widescreen). Dolby Digital 5.1. 94 minutes. 1998. Miramax 17093. R. $24.98.</I>

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Jon Iverson Posted: Nov 12, 2000 0 comments

This week, <A HREF="http://www.2netFX.com">2netFX</A>, which specializes in providing streaming technology for intranet and broadband Internet media delivery, has announced that its new HDTV-over-IP streaming technology will be featured in a live demonstration of Gigabit Ethernet over fiber in conjunction with <A HREF="http://www.worldwidepackets.com">World Wide Packets</A> at Comdex in Las Vegas. The new approach is intended to enable Internet Service Providers, cable television companies, and telecommunication carriers to base new services on HDTV technology.

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HT Staff Posted: Nov 11, 2000 0 comments
Business travelers often find themselves a captive audience for airlines movie offerings. Sharp Electronics now has a lightweight key to entertainment freedom: the DV-L80U portable DVD player. Sharp claims the player's 8" screen is the largest LCD of its type---more than 30% larger than that of the new unit's predecessor---and in widescreen 16:9 aspect ratio.
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Barry Willis Posted: Nov 10, 2000 0 comments

What would you pay for a display with more than four times the resolution of the best HDTV on the market today? Don't even bother to answer that unless you are an official at the US Department of Energy's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, which is scheduled to receive the first such units from <A HREF="http://www.ibm.com/news/2000/11/10.phtml"> IBM</A>. The new 22-inch display boasts an astounding 200 pixels per inch and a total of more than 9 million pixels on its screen. It is said to create images "as clear as an original photograph."

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