LATEST ADDITIONS

Daniel Kumin Posted: Jul 29, 2002 0 comments
Photos by Tony Cordoza

Dreaming of a preamp/processor to anchor a high-performance home theater, you'd probably imagine some pretty sophisticated hardware. It would have 6.1-channel Dolby Digital EX and DTS-ES Discrete decoding, of course, along with outputs for either one or two back surround speakers.

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Michael Antonoff Posted: Jul 29, 2002 0 comments
Photos by Tony Cordoza

Over the years personal stereo has evolved from an offensive weapon (think boombox) to a defensive one. When you're wearing earphones in a crowd, you're ensconced in a zone of privacy. People don headphones at a health club or on the street in part to signify they don't want to be approached.

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Doug Newcomb Posted: Jul 29, 2002 0 comments
Photos by Tony Cordoza

I consider myself very fortunate to have a wife who indulges my obsessions. There's the time last summer when she sat in a rental car on a sweltering beach in Baja while I surfed for more than an hour.

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HT Staff Posted: Jul 29, 2002 0 comments
Let's face it. Plenty of movie and music fans aren't gearheads. For those who aren't, audio and video equipment is simply a means toward an end. They prefer equipment that literally disappears.
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HT Staff Posted: Jul 29, 2002 0 comments
Many home theater fans have come to the hobby from an audiophile background. For these folks, sound quality is equally important to picture quality in the pursuit of the ultimate home entertainment experience. Integra has designed the DPS-7.2 DVD player with these customers in mind.
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Posted: Jul 28, 2002 0 comments

In his review of the <A HREF="http://www.guidetohometheater.com/showarchives.cgi?23">Wharfedale Pacific Surround Speaker System</A>, John J. Gannon writes that, although Wharfedale is not a well-known company in the US, "By introducing cutting-edge designs at affordable prices, they're now obviously aiming to change that." Gannon listens carefully to determine how well they've succeeded.

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Barry Willis Posted: Jul 28, 2002 0 comments

Atlanta-based <A HREF="http://www.cox.com">Cox Communications, Inc</A>. is expanding its nationwide rollout of its new high definition television service with HDTV for the Las Vegas market, according to a July 22 announcement. Viewers in Cox's market of more than 600,000 homes in the desert city will be able to avail themselves of new set-top boxes using what the company describes as "completely integrated technology."

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Posted: Jul 28, 2002 0 comments

If you're among the handful of home theater fans who have purchased JVC&rsquo;s D-Theater videocassette machine, rejoice. On July 25, DreamWorks, Fox Home Entertainment, and Universal Studios announced the impending release of several new titles in the copy-protected ultra-high-resolution D-VHS format.

Thomas J. Norton Posted: Jul 28, 2002 0 comments

The cathode-ray tube, or CRT, has been the mainstay of direct-view sets since Philo Farnsworth exclaimed, "Uncle Milty, come here, I need you!" And when projection television entered the scene, the trusty CRT stayed the course. While new technologies are beginning to make inroads on the market, virtually all of today's rear-projection sets still use three separate CRTs to produce an image. Despite its challengers, the CRT still provides the best combination of quality and affordability a consumer can get in a one-piece set. But CRT sets are complex, fussy, and, when used in the large screen sizes consumers now demand, massive. A typical 60-inch-diagonal RPTV can weigh 250 lbs and take up more space than a large refrigerator.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Jul 28, 2002 0 comments

The Sony VPL-VW11HT LCD projector is an update of the VPL-VW10HT, reviewed in the June 2000 <I>SGHT</I>. It uses the same 16:9 LCD panel as the Grand Wega KF-60DX100, but wraps it in a compact front-projector chassis. It offers the same wide range of aspect ratios plus a few additional ones, and accepts 480i, 480p, 720p, and 1080i component or RGB sources, scaling them all to the panel's native resolution of 1366x768. (Unlike in the Grand Wega, 720p is not first converted to standard-definition 480p.) There are also composite and S-video inputs, but no digital input. Six user-programmable video memories store, among other things, the user's calibrated picture settings, selected color temperature, and a default aspect ratio.

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