LATEST ADDITIONS

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Jon Iverson Posted: Oct 29, 2000 0 comments

Last week, <A HREF="http://www.world.sony.com">Sony</A> and <A HREF="http://www.candescent.com">Candescent Technologies</A>, a developer of flat panel displays (FPD), announced an agreement to extend their existing partnership. In October 1998, the two companies announced their initial agreement regarding the joint development of high voltage Field Emission Display (FED) technology for "next generation" thin, flat-panel displays. The new agreement extends their joint technology development partnership, under which the two companies say they will co-fund these activities, until December 2001.

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Joe Leydon Posted: Oct 29, 2000 0 comments

M<I>ichael Caine, Nigel Green, Guy Doleman, Sue Lloyd. Directed by Sidney J. Furie. Aspect ratio: 2.35:1 (widescreen). Dolby Digital mono. 107 minutes. 1965. Anchor Bay DV10925. NR. $24.98.</I>

Joel Brinkley Posted: Oct 29, 2000 0 comments

Seldom in my life as an equipment reviewer has a product arrived that, out of the box, I've known I wanted to own. The Pioneer DV-AX10 is one of them&mdash;the first universal player that can handle CD, Super Audio CD, DVD-Audio, and DVD-Video, complete with progressive-scan video output. It's a wonder to behold and a joy to use.

J. Gordon Holt Posted: Oct 29, 2000 0 comments

Something that never fails to irritate me is an intemperately enthusiastic review of an outrageously expensive product. I'm sure this is partly because I hate reading about something that might just be every bit as good as the reviewer says it is when I can't afford to buy it. But I think the greater part of my pique is because I suspect the reviewer was so awestruck by the product's princely price that he couldn't bring himself to find fault with it. Oh, sure, he'll pick a few nits just to show how perceptive he is, but his "report" will essentially be an exercise in idolatry, with nary a question about value for money.

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Posted: Oct 29, 2000 0 comments

Hoping to fulfill the long-awaited promise of delivering broadband entertainment direct to the television, <A HREF="http://www.intertainer.com/">Intertainer</A>, <A HREF="http://www.uniview.com/">uniView Technologies</A>, and Microsoft have buddied up and announced that they will join <A HREF="http://www.zoomtown.com">ZoomTown.com</A> to market-test a service that will provide asymmetrical digital subscriber line (ADSL) broadband entertainment directly to consumers' televisions. ZoomTown.com says it expects to deploy the service to its more than 35,000 subscribers next year following completion of the trial.

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Posted: Oct 29, 2000 0 comments

The battle of the giants continued in late October as <A HREF="http://www.disney.com/">Walt Disney Company</A> filed another complaint with the <A HREF="http://www.fcc.gov/">Federal Communications Commission</A> over a proposed merger between Time Warner and America Online. This time, Disney is protesting that the companies will keep competitors from using AOL/TW-controlled interactive-TV services

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Barry Willis Posted: Oct 29, 2000 0 comments

If <A HREF="http://www.c-3d.net/"> Constellation 3D, Inc</A>. succeeds with its ambitious plan to develop a high-density optical disc, "FMD" will be the next acronym to enter the technophile lexicon. The letters stand for Fluorescent Multilayer Disc, a recordable format under development that promises 100 gigabytes of storage on a disc no bigger than an ordinary DVD.

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Mike Wood Posted: Oct 28, 2000 Published: Oct 29, 2000 0 comments
We've often said that a projector is only as good as the processor that feeds it. The most expensive projector on the planet won't save your picture from a bad video processor. Until now, most people bought projectors and processors like dim sum: à la carte or piece by piece. With few exceptions, they would buy a projector from one company and a processor from another. Runco is looking to change all that by tailoring their processors to work with specific display devices so that you can get the most out of both.
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Chris Lewis Posted: Oct 28, 2000 Published: Oct 29, 2000 0 comments
No matter which side of the receivers-versus-separates debate you find yourself on, it's simple to understand why A/V receivers have the broad appeal among home theater buyers that they do—they're easy, period. A well-executed receiver is easy to purchase, easy to set up, and easy to use. These are commodities that go a long way in any market today, regardless of bottom-line performance. And let's face it, the performance of receivers has improved considerably in recent years. You're still not going to see dedicated theaters or music rooms built around a receiver, but you won't get laughed out of the room anymore when you start comparing its performance to that of comparably priced separates. Context is key in the receiver game. What do you really need, where do you need it, and how much are you willing to pay for it?
Bruce Fordyce Posted: Oct 28, 2000 Published: Oct 29, 2000 0 comments
Installing a multiroom in-ceiling speaker system. Let's face it, gang: Many of us spend our lives swinging through the work week like modern-day Jedi Knights, slicing through red tape and stupidity only to languish for 45 minutes inching through vicious gridlock to get home. The only thing keeping yours truly from eating the business end of a Browning pistol is knowing that, when I get home to my suburban stucco castle, I can slip into a nice sixer of Harp lager and listen to the soothing melodies of classic Dead Kennedys.

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