OTHER TECH

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Posted: Apr 04, 2007 0 comments

Klipsch might be the most recognizable name in speakers. After all, the company has been around for more than 60 years - ever since founder Paul Klipsch figured out how to create a compact version of the huge horn speakers used in movie theaters.

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Ken C. Pohlmann Posted: Mar 29, 2010 0 comments

You've probably seen them outside the supermarket. You know - those big red vending machines. But instead of a soda for $1.25, you get a movie. For $1. Swipe your credit/debit card, and the disc is all yours for the night. That's Redbox, and the machines are popping up everywhere, ready to supply the masses with low-commitment, impulse-rental DVDs. With 20,000 machines, each holding about 500 discs, Redbox is making tons of money. And some Hollywood studios are going ballistic.

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John Sciacca Posted: Dec 02, 2006 0 comments

Many people hide their A/V gear behind cabinet doors or put the system off in a closet somewhere. But how do you control everything when you can't point the remote at any of it? The oh-so-simple solution is to install an infrared (IR) repeating system, which carries signals from your remote to wherever your gear may live.

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Jamie Sorcher Posted: Feb 01, 2004 0 comments
Sonnefeld photos by Michelle Hood Barry Sonnenfeld is the master of droll. You can see it in his work, from John Travolta's suave, minivan-driving gangster in Get Shorty to Tommy Lee Jones's slow-burning G-man in Men in Black to Patrick Warburton's oblivious superhero in The Tick.
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Posted: Jul 26, 2004 0 comments

Fable is every gamer's fantasy come true: a role-playing experience where actions have lasting consequences.

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Michael Antonoff Posted: Jun 05, 2007 0 comments

In the last 5 years, more than 50 companies have introduced home-network-ready receivers that connect your computer with your TV and audio system so you can stream music, TV shows, movies, and photos from the home office to your home theater. As place-shifting devices go, Apple TV - the slickest media receiver yet - is decidedly late to the game.

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Rich Warren Posted: Jan 11, 2005 0 comments

After traipsing dozens of miles through aisles as crowded as a big city subway train in rush hour, I have seen thousands of light-emitting diodes, if not hundreds of thousands. I have seen every video display technology and their variations known to civilization. I have heard nearly every reproducible sound audible to the human ear.

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Michael Antonoff Posted: Jun 11, 2001 0 comments

Backward-compatibility can come at the expense of innovation, as we learned from the failure of the Digital Compact Cassette in the early '90s. The DCC format enabled a new generation of hardware both to record digital tape cassettes and to play standard analog cassettes.

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Al Griffin Posted: Apr 08, 2010 0 comments

Just days before boarding a plane in January for the 2010 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, I made a point of doing something that many other folks the world over had been doing in droves: I watched Avatar at my local IMAX 3D theater. And I don’t think I’m alone in saying that it was the most involving 3D movie I’d ever seen. The distinct illusion of depth conveyed by the image projected on that massive IMAX screen was an entirely new sensation. In many ways, Avatar was the greatest movie experience I’d ever sat through.

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John Sciacca Posted: Jul 07, 2008 0 comments

The home theater industry is so young and varied that it hasn't produced many people that can be considered legends. But there is one man who actually created the concept of home theater as we know it today, and who continues to push the boundaries and redefine what home theater can be.

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Ken C. Pohlmann Posted: May 04, 2006 0 comments

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James K. Willcox Posted: Apr 05, 2006 0 comments
Remember when the DVD was introduced? Remember how all the hardware companies and Hollywood studios played nice together, bringing out a steady flow of players and movies? Well, you can forget about that when the HD DVD and Blu-ray high-def disc formats debut over the next few months.
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Theo Kalomirakis Posted: Feb 12, 2009 0 comments

My love for old movie theaters is not unconditional. Some landmarks from the 1920s and '30s, mostly located in major metropolitan areas, still inspire awe.

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SV Staff Posted: Jul 05, 2007 0 comments

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Will Greenwald Posted: Oct 13, 2010 0 comments

Sony has finally drawn the curtain from its Google TV-powered product line. In a press conference today in New York, the company announced the Sony Internet TV, a series of HDTVs equipped with Google TV connectivity features. The Internet TV products use Google's Android OS and Chrome web browser, and are powered by an Intel Atom CPU, making them effectively web-surfing computers with integrated HD screens. They come with a number of streaming media apps, including Netflix, Youtube, Napster, and Pandora.

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