CES 2012

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Jan 16, 2012 1 comments

Chief Twit Leo Laporte and I explore the show floor at CES 2012. Our first stop is the DTS booth to interview legendary producer/engineer/musician Alan Parsons and engineer/producer Elliot Scheiner. Next, we head to the LG booth, where Leo is impressed with the 3D video wall and we take a look at the 55-inch OLED flat panel and Google TV. At the Sharp booth, Kerry Hodel explains the company's ICC-4K upscaling and shows us a stunning 8K display, after which we wander over to Samsung, where Stuart Silloway shows us the ES8000 LED-LCD TV, Samsung's 55-inch OLED, and the Verizon FiOS app. Finally, we take a quick look at Sony's Crystal LED flat panel, which seems to be that company's version of OLED.

Run Time: 1:43:46

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Barb Gonzalez Posted: Jan 16, 2012 0 comments
Until now, DLNA certifications were used for personal content--movies, music, and photos--stored in media libraries in your home network.

This is a revolutionary advance because manufacturers have been searching for a way to make movie and TV studios comfortable with sharing premium content in a way that cannot be pirated. Premium Video certified products will communicate digital rights management information for each movie or TV show and allow the streaming to take place but will not allow recording. In fact, devices that can record--NAS drives, computers--will probably not be Premium Video certified.

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Barb Gonzalez Posted: Jan 15, 2012 0 comments

Technicolor showed off M-Go, the robust new media app for TVs, tablets, smart phones and computers that makes it possible to access anything you want to watch on the device or thrown to your TV. Through a simple menu on your mobile device or computer you can get to your desired movie or TV show without the need to navigate to each service, comb through the TV program guide or scroll through your DVR to find it.

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Barb Gonzalez Posted: Jan 15, 2012 0 comments
Along with control and second screen capabilities, TV manufacturers are pairing their tablets to TVs allowing users to send media to their big screen directly from their tablet.

The TV apps make it possible to “fling” photos, music, or movies that are stored on the tablet towards the TV and have it play on the big screen. Most apps will be able to find media stored on other sources--computers, media servers--in a home network and push that media to the TV (Media Renderer capabilities).

Both the tablets apps and the TVs are DLNA certified which makes the media sharing possible. While this is possible on other DLNA certified media apps, the paired apps will undoubtedly create a seamless experience.

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Tom Norton Posted: Jan 15, 2012 2 comments
I remember CESs of long ago—that's about five to ten years, an eternity in CES time— when all of the literature handed out was in print form. Now it's typically on a flash drive, a disc (and even they are getting thinner on the ground—particularly the tiny ones that can't be used on Mac computers) or a simple card with directions to a news-release website. But not always; there's still a pile of paper to deal with, like the 6-inch stack I brought home with me. Luckily I drive to the show.

One of the realities of blogging at CES is that we here at Home Theater cover the video news first, which means that most of the video-related entries end up at the bottom of the blog pile, with the later, heavily audio-related entries at the top. That's why the blogs here are front-loaded with audio. Much of the serious high-end audio is at the Venetian Hotel, well removed from the of the circus atmosphere at the Las Vegas Convention Center where just about everything else, including the video, resides.

You may see a lot of audio entries below and wonder why? Well, for my part, I can't escape my roots of a dozen years or more writing the Stereophile. But more importantly for our present purposes, speakers are speakers, and I spent most of my time at the Venetian scoping them out. While many speakers that you'll see here will be inappropriate for home theater, largely because their manufacturers don't see fit to make matching center channel speakers for them, the technology involved is still fascinating. To me, anyway.

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