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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: May 11, 2007 0 comments
Outlaw Audio took the wraps off the company's latest and most powerful amplifier, the 7900, which is rated at 7 x 300 watts continuous into 8 ohms and 7 x 450 watts into 4 ohms. At 125 pounds (56.6990463 kilograms), the amp weighs just a couple of pounds more than former talk-show host Ricki Lake's new bod (US Magazine says she went from size 24 to 4 without surgery). Unlike Ms. Lake, the 7900 eats so much electricity, it uses two separate power cords. Outlaw Audio suggests you plug it in to two different outlets, so make sure you have an extra-long extension cord. In addition to the price of the extension cord, figure on spending $3,500 for the 7900.
Darryl Wilkinson Posted: May 03, 2007 0 comments
An HTIB you can grow to love.

Denon has a long and venerable history in the audio/video industry, including much of the pioneering work in the field of digital audio. Fitting of that tradition, Denon was, for many years, a brand reserved solely for the audiophile (later followed by the videophile) who frequented the high-end shops. This was a no-nonsense era for Denon, and its designers and engineers eschewed flashy features and other niceties, such as easy-to-use menus.

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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Apr 02, 2007 0 comments
IBM is showing off a prototype optical transceiver chipset that's capable of reaching speeds at least eight times faster than other optical components available today. The new tiny gizmo moves information at 160 Gigabits - that's 160 billion bits of information for the techno-term-challenged - per second. Such speediness is accomplished not by using wires, but by using light.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Apr 02, 2007 0 comments
Axiom Audio says its new EP400 powered subwoofer is designed for maximum bass output in smaller rooms. The sub itself is relatively small, measuring 13.75" high and 10.5" wide, but it's supposed to be capable of generating an in-room SPL of 116 dB and a low-end response of 23 Hz. The sub was designed primarily for use in small rooms, such as bedrooms, dens, or home offices. (It's probably not appropriate for bathrooms, where you really don't want to see another bottom end.)
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Apr 02, 2007 0 comments
Sony took the lens caps off of two new front home theater projector bargains last week.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Mar 27, 2007 0 comments
Texas Instruments says its prototype DLP projector is small enough to fit in your pocket, and you'll be happy to see it, too.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Mar 26, 2007 0 comments
Bigger is always better, at least when it comes to hard drives - or so thinks Interact-TV. The Linux-based digital-entertainment-device and media-server maker is introducing the company's new T2 Media Server that boasts over 2.25 Terabytes of storage capability. The T2 is a Linux Media Center that includes 720p component video output, new MPEG2 video encoding, as well as DVD and recorded video upscaling to 720p.
Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Mar 22, 2007 Published: Feb 22, 2007 0 comments
Moving speakers for moving pictures.

I've had the good fortune of being able to bring some extremely cool gear into my house: a 50-inch plasma HDTV (way back when 50 inches was big for a plasma), a $40,000 Kaleidescape multiroom movie server, and, last but not least, five gorgeous Legacy Audio Harmony in-wall speakers (each one weighing 54 pounds). So, when something arrives and causes more than one member of my family to say, "That's the coolest thing you have ever reviewed," I know there's something special about it.

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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Mar 20, 2007 0 comments
Martin Logan's new on-wall/off-wall Fresco i is another gorgeous speaker from a company known for its pretty, precise speakers.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Mar 19, 2007 0 comments
According to Outlaw Audio, exceptional consumer demand is the reason why it is now offering its first not-a-subwoofer loudspeaker. Calls for transducers from these electronics producers increased dramatically following the introduction of the company's not-multichannel RR 2150 Retro Receiver.

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