Steven Stone

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Steven Stone Posted: Jan 06, 2007 0 comments

When I say, "horn loudspeaker," what do you think of first? Most longtime audiophiles immediately visualize big corner-mounted Klipsch K-Horns or Altec Lansing "Voice of the Theater" speakers. Although horn-mounted technology is not as common today as it was during the golden age of mono in the '40's and '50's, it still exists. The Triad InRoom Platinum speaker system ($29,850 as tested), for example, is very much here and now.

Steven Stone Posted: Sep 16, 2006 0 comments

Although exhibits at THE SHOW were primarily an example of how out of touch some high-end audio manufacturers are with reality, Magnepan's Wendell Diller demonstrated that given a deadline with a wad of money at the end a fertile mind can find a way to solve a technical problem. True dipole ribbon speakers don't lend themselves to in-wall placement, but when the owner of a large and well-heeled casino chose Magnepans for their high-roller suites Diller devised a way. He automated his panels so when the video display is turned on the panels swing away from the wall, ready for action. With an adjustable angle and automatic reset if bumped, these Maggies are ready to deliver more sparkle than a trough full of slot machine quarters

Steven Stone Posted: Sep 16, 2006 0 comments

Atlantic Technology unveiled a new in-wall speaker that features an adjustable crossover that alters the speaker's lobbing effects to better control the speakers imaging and harmonic balance. Even when situated relatively high on the wall behind a Screen Research acoustically transparent screen the sound seemed to come from several feel below the speaker's actual physical position. Magic? No just solid engineering.

Steven Stone Posted: Sep 16, 2006 0 comments

Limelight audio premiered their line of furniture with built-in speakers. With full 360 degree dispersion due to an upward firing midrange/tweeter and downward firing woofer, these granite veneered cabinets have their own patent pending and a three-way light switch. They actually make sound and can produce filament shaking bass.

Steven Stone Posted: Sep 16, 2006 0 comments

Gibson introduced a whole new line of accessories bearing the Gibson logo, including USB cards, blank CDR disks, cables, CDR burner, and portable hard drives. No prices, or availability date, or any other information was available at the show. Obviously Gibson thinks that we all need to have the Gibson brand on stuff we can already get from over a dozen sources already. Rock on, Dudes.

Steven Stone Posted: Sep 16, 2006 1 comments

Without fail, every CEDIA show Sharp tempts me with a 1-bit audio system. This year's installment has the catchy designation of BD/MPC10. With a Blue Ray player, 1-bit digital amplifier, speakers that look like high-tech ashtrays, and built-in Odyssey room correction system it looked and sounded very moderne. Price, delivery date, and final specifications are all TBA, naturally

Steven Stone Posted: Sep 16, 2006 0 comments

Earthquake Sound's head designer demonstrates why you don't want to walk around holding their new floor-shaking driver. Made to mount under a wooden floor, this new pistonic vibrator can make things go bump in the night, day, or even the middle of the afternoon.

Steven Stone Posted: Sep 16, 2006 0 comments

The best free gift at CEDIA came from CoolIT Systems who make cooling systems from high-end gaming and home theater PCs. Their Cool It chiller plugs into any USB port (either 1.0 or 2.0) to power its cooling element, which will keep a can of soda deliciously chilled for as long as your computer is on. Ideal for those all night illegal downloading sessions.

Steven Stone Posted: Sep 16, 2006 0 comments

The most exciting product at the show with a nautical theme was debatably the "talking Pirate Skull" from Themeaddicts Inc. This patented product was developed for those poor souls who always wanted their own animatronic character (or any other character for that matter.) the skull "wakes up" and verbally provides real-time information about people walking up your driveway, entering your yard, standing at your front door, urinating on your daisies, or anything else your home automation/security system can monitor.

Steven Stone Posted: Sep 16, 2006 0 comments

Maine is know for occasionally hostile weather, so it should come as no surprise that a company based in Maine should develop an all-weather speaker designed to handle even the most extreme conditions. Terra speakers "All Climate" models use a molded one-piece enclosure, cast aluminum mid/bass driver baskets, titanium dome tweeters, and a spiderless magnetic fluid centering system for their bass drivers. Available in a variety of colors, they have a sound that is both well grounded and liquid. Priced around $330 each, the Terra AV series will make any ground squirrel stop and take notice.

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