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John Sciacca Posted: Oct 29, 2013 1 comments
Perusing your favorite AV site (it’s this one, right?!), browsing real or virtual aisles of an electronics store, or surfing the Web, you’ve undoubtedly run across multiple companies offering to improve your audio by adding a soundbar. With models ranging from sub $100 to over $2,000, it’s a category that has exploded practically overnight.

In a way, soundbars can be likened to nuclear power; used correctly, they can improve your life, but misused can kill everyone in the world several times over. (I don’t have all the science needed to back that up, but I’m pretty sure it’s true.)

John Sciacca Posted: Aug 24, 2008 0 comments
The Short Form
$699 / SOUNDCASTSYSTEMS.COM / 800-722-1293
Snapshot
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John Sciacca Posted: May 27, 2004 0 comments

Every day, in audio/video superstores across this great land, the same scenario plays out with frightening regularity. Someone, lusting after high-definition TV, spends thousands of dollars on the set of his dreams. And then, having been turned on to surround sound by hearing his buddy's home theater, he asks the salesman to recommend a speaker system.

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John Sciacca Posted: Apr 16, 2014 2 comments
A few weeks ago I got an email notification from my Kaleidescape movie server saying temperatures has exceeded safe operating range and the server would be shutting itself down if temps didn’t soon return to normal. “What the hell?!” I wondered. Nothing had changed in my rack, I hadn’t added any new gear or changed anything with the ventilation and the server was exactly where it had always been sitting and working fine for the past few years. Of course, I immediately blamed my 7 year old daughter, accusing her of all manner of destructive behavior, but when she assured me she was (in this case) innocent, I searched further.
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John Sciacca Posted: Jan 08, 2014 Published: Jan 09, 2014 0 comments
Many people think that a Kaleidescape movie server system is just for people needing to manage a massive movie collection. And while it is certainly great for them, the company feels that its new Cinema One system featuring the company’s award winning interface offers many benefits for even the casual movie collector, and that once someone experiences how easy the system is to use, they will become collectors.

Now, Kaleidescape is giving you a reason to purchase its new Limited Edition Cinema One movie server even if you don’t already own a large movie collection. In fact, the company is giving you 50 reasons, in the form of 50 preloaded titles that have been hand-selected by the company!

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John Sciacca Posted: Sep 05, 2007 0 comments

"Two hundred channels and nothing to watch!" How many times have you felt that way? Or maybe you've wanted to finish watching a DVD in another room but didn't have a second player. Or wished you could keep an eye on the kids outside without sitting in the sweltering heat. Or wanted to see the video display from your iPod docked in another room.

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John Sciacca Posted: Jul 06, 2006 0 comments

Step 1: Check file compatibility While computers can accept a variety of music file types, servers have more limited compatibility. If your server isn't "friendly" with your formats, you'll either have to re-rip, download, or buy them all over again, or convert them to a compatible format, which will cause additional compression artifacts.

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John Sciacca Posted: Dec 02, 2006 0 comments

Many people hide their A/V gear behind cabinet doors or put the system off in a closet somewhere. But how do you control everything when you can't point the remote at any of it? The oh-so-simple solution is to install an infrared (IR) repeating system, which carries signals from your remote to wherever your gear may live.

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John Sciacca Posted: May 05, 2006 2 comments

Is getting a flat-panel set out of the box and onto the wall something you can do yourself, or do you need to hire a pro? Assuming you don't want to run any wires inside the wall, mounting a flat-panel is probably a "6" on the difficulty scale. So if you think you're up to the challenge, read on!

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