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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Jan 08, 2010 0 comments
Tiny projectors - like this one from Microvision - are big this year, although picture size and quality isn't necessarily so. I overheard one presenter say you could project an image up to 200 inches with one of these types of projectors. Technically, I suppose you could send a photon from one of these projectors to Mars, but that doesn't mean it's watchable at that size or distance.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Jun 11, 2005 0 comments
If only you could take your TiVo with you...
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Jan 10, 2015 0 comments
Because I suffer from a rare form of workophobia and isolationism, I sometimes have to take a timeout from the world at large and listen to music or some sort of hypnotic trance-inducing soundscape. Lying down with headphones is difficult, at best, and even using in-ear monitors can be uncomfortable when you’re lying on your side. Of course, then there’s the headphone/earbud cable albatross around your neck that invariably gets caught on something and yanks one of the buds out of your ear or wraps around your neck almost strangling you.

SleepPhones calls its headphone-embedded headband “pajamas for your ears”, and they’re designed to be...

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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: May 23, 2006 0 comments
The Video Software Dealers Association (VSDA) - the dudes who spend most of their working hours watching and selling movies and video games (man, what a life - it'a almost as devoid of real "work" as being an audio/video gear reviewer) - have released its nominations for the organization's 2006 Home Entertainment Awards. While some of the categories include such blockbusters as "Marketing Campaign of the Year", "Sell-through Title of the Year", and "Rental Title of the Year", others are likely to be of more interest to the average video junkie.
Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Oct 28, 2005 Published: Jun 28, 2005 0 comments
Acoustically transparent projection screens let you put the voices where the action is.

When you see a movie in a commercial cinema, it's easy to suspend disbelief and pretend you're watching the action through a window. One important reason for this is the fact that the sound of the characters' voices seems to come from their apparent location, rather than from above or below the screen.

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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 27, 2013 0 comments
RedSeat Entertainment is launching the Tremor FX Home, “a dynamic home theater system that incorporates seat vibrations into movies, games and other entertainment.” Available in both pre-installed versions as well as kits for retrofitting into existing seating, Tremor FX’s technology is designed to dynamically vibrate and pulsate in response to a movie’s soundtrack via a series of actuators integrated into each seat.
Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Aug 06, 2015 0 comments

InRoom Bronze LR-H Speaker System
Performance
Build Quality
Value

InWall Bronze/4 SlimSub
Performance
Build Quality
Value
PRICE $11,050

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Dolby Atmos enabled
Natural, open character
Superb match with InWall Bronze/4 SlimSub
Minus
Atmos operation limits use in cabinets or behind a screen

THE VERDICT
Awesome for Atmos and awesome at most everything else.

Nine out of 11.4 people (approximately) reading this report are thinking, “Who the hell is Triad?” (Hopefully, fewer folks are asking, “What the hell is Atmos?” If you’re one of them, hang in there. I’ll get to Atmos in a bit.) To answer the original question, Triad is a Swiss Army Knife-like manufacturer of custom-installed speakers. That is, regardless of the particular application, Triad has a blade—er, speaker—designed and built for it (in the U.S. of A., by the way). You need in-room, in-ceiling, or in-wall speakers? Check. Invisible in-wall speakers? Ditto. OK, what kind of subwoofer do you want? The standard in-room or an in-wall design? Yes and yes. (Yawn.) Why not try something a little less common, like one of Triad’s on-wall, in-cabinet, or in-ceiling subwoofers? Then there’s Triad’s esoteric and rather sinister-looking FlexSub, which includes an expandable, flexible tube that channels the bass output from the hidden subwoofer cabinet to a remotely located grate or grille.

Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Jun 07, 2010 0 comments
Price: $3,400 At A Glance: Totally invisible speakers • Extremely diffuse dispersion • Must be used with a subwoofer

Invisible or Invisibull?

It’s a terrible disease in which your brain gets eaten away from the inside out—yet you won’t see those little donation boxes at checkout counters begging for your loose change to find a cure. In fact, most people aren’t aware that it even exists, although they certainly see its debilitating effects every day. It’s called Chronic Euphemism Syndrome (CES), and it runs rampant throughout consumer electronics companies’ marketing departments. Salespeople suffer mightily from it, too. The entire profession is tainted with images of the truth being throttled to within inches of its life in the back room where the salesperson heads after he says, “Let me ask my manager.”

Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Nov 22, 2005 0 comments
There's beauty in these boxes.

When you live with something or somebody long enough (no matter how good the body—or how great the personality), it's all too easy to become complacent about how well off you are. That thought came to mind the other night when I was watching, of all things, The Blues Brothers. I had forgotten how great the music is in that movie. But then I noticed that part of what had made me rediscover my appreciation for the movie was the truly nice Triad Silver speaker system I had been living with for a little while but had stopped noticing.

Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Oct 11, 2013 0 comments

Performance
Build Quality
Value
PRICE $1,400

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Installer setup over IP
Options for wide, narrow, and frameless grilles
Six-band parametric EQ
Minus
Installation may be tricky for the uninitiated

THE VERDICT
Extensive tuning capabilities make for true high-end performance at an affordable price.

When it comes to architectural speakers, there are few companies I can think of that do things in a more focused, more insightful, and—most important when it comes to custom installations—more useful way than Triad. The company stands out in another way, too, in that most of Triad’s speakers are built to order in the U.S. (Portland, Oregon, to be specific) and are usually less than two weeks old by the time they arrive at the dealer’s warehouse door.

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