Darryl Wilkinson

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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 13, 2009 84 comments
Walking around CEDIA, you'll see tools you never knew existed designed to solve problems you never knew anyone ever had. Although I've always believed that (1) you should always use the right tool for the right job,(2) you can never have enough tools, and (3) battery/electric tools are always better than ones that require my own muscle power; there are some tools on display here that even I can't justify having at home. My wife will probably say I have a hole in my head when I say I need this tool, but I can't help wanting the awesome Hole Pro Adjustable Hole Cutter drill attachment. It's capable of cutting smooth holes in all kinds of materials (dry wall, plywood, even some metal). But wait - there's more! As the name implies, it's adjustable; so this one tool can be used to drill anything from a 1 7/8-inch hole to a 17-inch hole. And the clear plastic housing not only catches all the dust and debris as you're cutting - it also serves as a support housing that makes sure you drill the hole perpendicular to the plain of the surface you're cutting. A built-in depth gauge prevents you from drilling too far into your wall and into a water pipe or speaker wire. Models range from $119.95 to $164.95 depending on the maximum size hole the tool will cut. Check out the videos of the Hole Pro in action at the company's web site www.holepro.com.
Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 03, 2008 0 comments
Bringing back fond memories of the one misdirected year (1998) when CEDIA held its convention in New Orleans (just after another near-miss storm) and not many conventioneers (including me) made it to many of their appointments or meetings, SpeakerCraft enlisted the aid of some scantily clad acrobatic dancers to catch the attention of the press folks who didn’t go to the Toshiba press conference. (It worked.)
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Jan 11, 2012 0 comments
“People have been conditioned to accept poor quality sound, and we are here to change that,” claims Dean Kurnell, President of ClarityOne Audio. (Actually, we at HT Mag are here to change that, but we appreciate the help...) The company’s PureSound processor is designed to eliminate the distortion in analog speakers caused by magnetic field build-up that “occurs in traditional crossovers where only a single wire coil is used.” The patented technology is supposed to provide the most direct route possible for the signal while minimizing distortion between input and output.

The company’s first products to feature the PureSound processor are a series of earbuds and over-the-ear headphones. The PureSound technology allows ClarityOne to use 8 ohm voice coils in their models. Most other manufacturers, according to ClarityOne, use voice coils with a much higher resistance - including some that are more than 32 ohms - in order to mask distortion. In addition to providing better sound, having a lower-resistance voice coil means the player driving the earbuds/headphones doesn’t have to work as hard so the batteries’ charge lasts longer.

Prices are expected to start at $109 MSRP.

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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Apr 14, 2006 0 comments
ScreenTek, a company that sells laptop replacement screens (who knew there even was such a thing as a laptop replacement screen? I thought you were simply out of luck...), has developed a cleaning solution for LCD screens that are not in need of being replaced. Called PixelClean, the new screen cleaner was developed for high-gloss LCD screens like Sony XBRITE and Toshiba TruBrite - although the formulation is supposed to work as well on other types of flat-panel screens, such as less-advanced laptops, plasma TVs, and LCD TVs.
Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 05, 2008 0 comments
So lighting won’t make your home theater sound better, or will it? No, it really won’t, but it might make you think your home theater sounds better – and even if it doesn’t, it’ll definitely make your room look better. Traxon Technologies is a company that offers just about any kind of colorful – and changeable – lighting products, from strip lights to panels to, well, you name it. The lighting system I saw had a simple, programmable controller that let you change the colors of the lighting as well as program a schedule of color changes. You could even do a disco floor if you wanted to, but I think that definitely would make your home theater sound bad.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 27, 2004 0 comments
Wireless audio/video senders are nothing new, but until now such accessory devices were limited to the composite video outputs of your DVD player, cable box, VCR, or discretely positioned X10 camera. Belkin Corporation's new PureAV RemoteTV not only lets you send analog audio and video from composite or S-video sources wirelessly, Belkin claims it's the first to incorporate component-video connectivity.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 27, 2006 0 comments
The Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) is warning that a proposed bill in the Senate will be bad for U.S. consumers.
Darryl Wilkinson Posted: May 25, 2007 0 comments
It's not that your AVR doesn't love you. It's just misunderstood.

So you just bought your first AV receiver (AVR), and now you're staring in fright at the back panel and what looks to be several thousand connectors jammed together tighter than the squares on a New York Times sukodu puzzle – and just about as incomprehensible. Don't feel bad. Rocket scientists have been known to suffer heart palpitations in the same situation.

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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Jan 11, 2011 0 comments
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Oct 09, 2006 0 comments
Remote Technologies, Inc, a residential and commercial control products manufacturer more known to custom installers than the average retail consumer, is introducing three new keypads that will help the company's name appear in a broader range of homes with multi-room entertainment systems. RTI says the keypads are completely customizable, programmable, and upgradeable.

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