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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Jan 26, 2011 2 comments
The $7.99 per month that Netflix customers pay for unlimited streaming isn't enough, according to the folks at Time Warner and HBO. They want Netflix to raise the fee, and until that happens, they're withholding their content.

The story emerged in The Hollywood Reporter, which quoted a Time Warner executive saying Netflix streamers should pay $20 a month. Ouch. Until then, HBO refuses to license its premium content for Netflix streaming, citing the cost of producing that content and its value to viewers.

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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Apr 11, 2011 0 comments
Time Warner Cable and Viacom are in court over TWC's recently announced iPad app. Viacom, owner of CBS and other TV networks, says the cable operator has violated their licensing agreements. TWC sued back, asking the federal court to declare the iPad app legal once and for all.

Viacom isn't the only content power to oppose the TWC app. News Corp., Scripps Networks, and Discovery Communications have also objected. But Viacom has the sharpest teeth, demanding millions in damages.

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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Apr 04, 2011 0 comments
Time Warner Cable recently introduced an innovative iPad app that allows subscribers to access live TV channels on everyone's favorite tablet. But a hostile response from content owners has forced the cable operator to sharply reduce the number of available channels.

It was (and still is) a beautiful idea. TWC subscribers who buy both TV and internet services get access to the app. It grabs a router wi-fi signal and displays channels without having to record them. Unlike Slingbox, it works only within the home. Not such a threat to Hollywood, right?

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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Apr 26, 2007 0 comments
At least one major cable operator is pruning analog channels in advance of the end of analog broadcasting, slated for February 17, 2009. Time Warner Cable's Staten Island Project will provide 100 new channels of HDTV to the southernmost borough of New York City.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Oct 06, 2015 1 comments
Hate your cable company? Sick of unrelenting robocalls that seem to pop up at home and on your cell at the most inopportune moments?

A federal judge fined Time Warner Cable $229,500 for robocalling a Texas woman 153 times in an attempt to dun another customer.

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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Jan 24, 2008 0 comments
Here's reason number 37,878 to resent the cable industry: It may soon start charging prohibitive tariffs on high-def downloads to penalize consumers who buy or rent from non-cable-controlled download services.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Aug 04, 2006 0 comments
Time Warner Cable of Raleigh, North Carolina will not supply CableCARDs for the forthcoming TiVo Series 3 HD DVR, according to ConsumerFury.com. A consumer emailed the company asking about the card and received this response: "Time Warner Cable of Raleigh does not provide support for or allow TIVO devices on our cable network. Time Warner Cable provides DVR service and equipment for customers that would like to record programs and watch them later. Cable Cards will only be installed on Cable ready, Cable Card slot available television sets. This policy is subject to change at the discretion of Time Warner Cable of Raleigh." Of course, as the response points out, TWC would rather have you rent TWC's DVR, no matter how bad it is. Presumably that's why the 1394 output of my own TWC-NYC cable box is disabled, preventing me from hooking up any form of HD-capable recorder. Nice logo.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Jan 07, 2015 0 comments
In a couple of months, Cambridge Audio will be shipping a couple of receivers.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Feb 22, 2008 0 comments
What if your DVR could record from other DVRs over the web? That was the provocative premise of TVCatchup, a U.K. startup. It sounded good to be true. And it was.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Aug 31, 2007 0 comments
There are several fears surrounding the U.S. transition to digital television broadcasting in 2009 and one of them relates to the set-top boxes that would keep old analog sets running. The federal government will attempt to allay that fear by awarding as many as two $40 coupons per household to help viewers buy the digital-to-analog devices. Judging from what's happening in the U.K., that looks pretty generous.

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