BLU-RAY MOVIE REVIEWS

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David Vaughn Posted: Jun 22, 2010 0 comments
Kirk (Jay Baruches) is a dorky underachiever who through a stroke of fate winds up dating the beautiful and successful Molly (Alice Eve). Now that he's got the girl he has to contend with his own insecurities as his friends and family barrage him negative feedback about his love life.

What a major disappointment and missed opportunity by screenwriters Sean Anders and John Morris. The two leads have genuine chemistry and are so likeable although the supporting roles are so sophomoric and crude any connection to the love story is thrown out the window with a constant barrage of F-bombs. Kirk's friends are a group of losers who don't deserve his friendship and even worse, Molly's best friend Patty (Kristen Ritter) is so crude she could make a sailor blush.

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David Vaughn Posted: Apr 14, 2010 0 comments
With the aid of his trusted ally Dr. John Watson (Jude Law), Sherlock Holmes (Robert Downey Jr.) is unequaled in his pursuit of criminals. After a string of ritualistic murders, the pair arrives just in time to save the latest victim and uncover the killer: Lord Blackwood (Mark Strong). He is sentenced to death but warns Holmes that death has no power over him, and he will rise again. It turns out he wasn't lying.

I'm not sure Sir Arthur Conan Doyle would approve of the modernized Sherlock Holmes, but it turns out he's one hell of an action hero. The DTS-HD MA 5.1 soundtrack features some great demo-worthy scenes, although the dialog is not entirely intelligible in a couple of scenes. The VC-1 encode is just as impressive, with exquisite detail, inky blacks, and well-resolved shadows.

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Barry Willis Posted: Mar 21, 2004 Published: Mar 22, 2004 0 comments

<I><B>Sherlock Holmes and the Secret Weapon</B> (68 minutes, 1942); <B>Sherlock Holmes Faces Death</B> (68 minutes, 1943); <B>Sherlock Holmes in Washington</B> (71 minutes, 1943). Directed by Roy William Neill. <B>Sherlock Holmes and the Voice of Terror</B> (66 minutes, 1942). Directed by John Rawlings. Aspect ratio: 4:3. Monophonic. B&W MPI Home Video DVD7545, DVD7549, DVD7540, DVD7550. NR. $27.88 each.</I>

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Corey Gunnestad Posted: Sep 10, 2012 0 comments
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Long before Batman had the Joker, the world’s greatest detective, Sherlock Holmes, had an evil nemesis who was every bit his equal in intelligence and powers of perception; the yin to his yang, so to speak. Professor James Moriarty was a precursor to the Bond villain and a blueprint for every criminal mastermind to come. In the previous Sherlock Holmes film, he was a mysterious and sinister presence concealed in darkness. For A Game of Shadows, he comes to the forefront to challenge the master detective to a game to the death and is played with relish by Jared Harris.
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David Vaughn Posted: Nov 19, 2010 0 comments
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's popular Victorian-era super sleuth gets a reboot in the 21st Century. Sherlock Holmes (Benedict Cumberbatch) is the go to detective consultant for Detective Inspector Lesrade (Rupert Graves) of the London police department. Ex-soldier/doctor John Watson (Martin Freeman) joins Holmes as his trusty sidekick in order to solve the most bizarre cases London has ever seen.

Thanks to the BBC this fabulous show has made its way across the pond via PBS and now Blu-ray. Although the 2-disc set has only three 90 minute episodes, each is so well-crafted that I'll gladly take quality over quantity. The two leads breathe new life into the characters and from the first moment they share the screen you know it’s a match made in heaven.

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David Vaughn Posted: Jun 13, 2008 0 comments

<IMG SRC="/images/archivesart/061308short.jpg" WIDTH=200 BORDER=0 ALIGN=RIGHT>Struck by lightning, a Defense Department robot malfunctions and, as a result, develops its own consciousness. Escaping the military, it finds refuge with a young woman (Ally Sheedy) who helps hide "Number 5" from its inventor, Newton Crosby (Steve Guttenberg), and the government who wants its weapon back.

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David Vaughn Posted: Sep 15, 2008 0 comments

<IMG SRC="/images/archivesart/shrekthethird.jpg" WIDTH=200 BORDER=0 ALIGN=RIGHT>When Shrek's father-in-law (John Cleese)&#151;or shall I say, frog-in-law&#151;passes away, Shrek (Mike Myers) is the next in line to the throne. But Shrek has a different set of priorities&#151;a return to his beloved swamp. Along with his two sidekicks, Donkey (Eddie Murphy) and Puss in Boots (Antonio Banderas), he embarks on an adventure to find the rightful heir to the throne&#151;Arthur (Justin Timberlake).

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David Vaughn Posted: Jun 10, 2010 0 comments

<IMG SRC="/images/archivesart/shutter.jpg" WIDTH=200 BORDER=0 ALIGN=RIGHT>When two U.S. marshals (Leonardo DiCaprio and Mark Ruffalo) investigate a mysterious disappearance of an inmate from a hospital for the criminally insane, the pair uncover an intricate web of deception where nothing may be as it seems. As the mystery unravels, Teddy (DiCaprio) uncovers some shocking truths about the island that will change his life forever.

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Chris Chiarella Posted: Apr 29, 2016 1 comments
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When a government strike against the Mexican drug cartel on American soil proves fruitful but costly, a dedicated FBI field agent (Emily Blunt) joins an interagency task force to help bring the men responsible to justice. She quickly learns, however, that her new colleagues have a disturbing tendency to bend or break the rules, or even write their own. They’re an effective bunch, albeit mysteriously motivated. The dangerous transport of a high-value prisoner to the U.S. yields valuable information, including the whereabouts of a crucial cartel tunnel under the border.
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Shane Buettner Posted: Dec 04, 2013 0 comments
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Director Steven Soderbergh’s latest firecracker of a movie, Side Effects, is really two distinct movies. As good as it is, it would have been even better if it had stuck with the first one. Side Effects begins as a harrowing look at a woman’s descent into a crushing clinical depression and finally full-blown psychosis.
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Fred Kaplan Posted: Nov 21, 2013 0 comments
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Silver Linings Playbook is the most oddly enticing rom-com in a long time. Think Billy Wilder filtered through Martin Scorsese, which isn’t a bad way to describe the flip sensibility and kinetic style of writer-director David O. Russell at his best (Three Kings and Flirting with Disaster, not I Heart Huckabees). It’s a movie about crazy people: self-destructive and socially oblivious in various ways to varying degrees, all of them finding a place in the sun through love, family, community, music, and sports.
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David Vaughn Posted: Apr 18, 2009 0 comments

<IMG SRC="/images/archivesart/sincity.jpg" WIDTH=200 BORDER=0 ALIGN=RIGHT>Based on Frank Miller's popular series of graphic novels, <i>Sin City</i> is a tale of killers, cops, hookers, and hit men, all inhabiting one very dangerous, very sexy city. The three interwoven stories star Bruce Willis as a cop who'll do anything to protect the girl (Jessica Alba); Mickey Rourke, hell-bent on revenge; and Benicio del Toro as a human Pez dispenser.

Chris Chiarella Posted: Feb 26, 2015 0 comments
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Sin City: You will never find a more wretched hive of scum and villainy. In A Dame to Kill For, the second big-screen adaptation of the works of writer/artist/director Frank Miller, we find that stripper Nancy (Jessica Alba) has been driven cuckoo-bananas by the events surrounding the death of her hero and one true love a few years ago. She now finds herself shadowed by the ghost of Bruce Willis (where have I seen that before?)
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Shane Buettner Posted: Jan 31, 2013 0 comments
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Everything worth knowing about teenagers in the 1980s is found in John Hughes’ 1984 directorial debut, Sixteen Candles. This is a perfect movie, capturing it all in just two days in the life of 16-year-old Samantha Baker (Molly Ringwald). Sam’s 16th birthday is the day before her older sister’s wedding, and it starts out anything but sweet. Her entire family is so consumed with the wedding details, they forget. Sam heads to the back-to-school dance saddled with her grandparents’ Asian exchange student Long Duk Dong, in love with impossibly sweet campus hunk Jake Ryan (Michael Schoeffling), and chased by relentless freshman geek, Farmer Ted (Anthony Michael Hall). Hilarity, revelations, and romance ensue.
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Chris Chiarella Posted: Jun 11, 2013 1 comments
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Half a century after the release of Dr. No, director Sam Mendes and a gifted team of screenwriters have managed to give audiences a James Bond film unlike any other. Skyfall is Daniel Craig’s third outing as 007, and yet the star is unafraid to show his advancing age, as we are reminded that the job of international secret agent apparently takes a heavy toll on all who dare to sign up for it.

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