LATEST ADDITIONS

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Posted: May 06, 2001 0 comments

Home Entertainment 2001 arrives at the Hilton Hotel & Towers in New York this week for three days, May 11-13. There will be more than 80 rooms stuffed with the latest high end audio and video gear, including dozens of brand new products. For more information about the show, go to the <A HREF="http://www.homeentertainment-expo.com">HE 2001 website</A>.

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Barry Willis Posted: May 06, 2001 0 comments

In a move that will keep union members working for at least the next three years, negotiators for the <A HREF="http://www.wga.org">Writers Guild of America</A> agreed to a new contract on May 4, three days beyond the date of a threatened strike. The WGA had agreed to let its members keep working as discussions continued beyond the renewal date for the old contract, which expired May 1.

Clint Walker Posted: May 02, 2001 Published: May 03, 2001 0 comments
A commanding performance from a well-disciplined pupil.

Over thirty years ago, B&W Loudspeakers set out to build a speaker that would set the standard in sound and build quality, a speaker that other companies would strive for years to keep up with. Today, there is little doubt that B&W's goal was achieved. In fact, the designs of yesterday were so successful that 80 percent of all classical recordings are monitored using B&W loudspeakers.

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Chris Lewis Posted: May 02, 2001 Published: May 03, 2001 0 comments
Innovative Audio's new speaker system begs the question, "What has your furniture done for you lately?"

I'll wager that, if you were to poll the attendees at January's Consumer Electronics Show as to which was the most intriguing audio demo at the expo this year, a large majority would respond with Tom Holman's 10.2-channel sonic roller-coaster ride over at Alexis Park. Sure, the high-resolution demos were purer, and I'll be damned if the two-channel rigs at that same venue didn't, on the whole, sound better than ever (two-channel ain't dead just yet, gang). Still, when it came down to pure entertainment value, Holman's demo undoubtedly stole the show.

Geoffrey Morrison Posted: May 02, 2001 Published: May 03, 2001 0 comments
The fifth sense.

From the time movies first emerged as a pastime, filmmakers and theater owners have tried to come up with ways to make the movie experience more and more realistic. The picture (other than size) couldn't change, so they tried other ways. Some, like the Smellorama, didn't work. Others, like multichannel sound, did. Moving from one channel to six or eight channels, most people would think, "I'm surrounded by sound. What else is there?" What all, or at least most, systems lack is the ability to touch you—to literally touch you. Clark Synthesis' line of transducers aims to change that with tactile sound.

Mike Wood Posted: May 02, 2001 Published: May 03, 2001 0 comments
The truth behind progressive-scan DVD players.

Conspiracy theories are like computer problems—almost everyone has one. From JFK's assassination to the demise of TWA flight 800, it's rare that everyone will accept the simplest explanation as the truth. Consumer electronics has its fair share of conspiracy theories, as well. They may not be as complex as a Louisiana district attorney's triangulated-bullet-trajectory theory, but they exist, nonetheless. What do you expect to happen when a large number of obsessive-compulsive personalities have too much free time and join a chat room?

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Barry Willis Posted: Apr 29, 2001 0 comments

Better late than never, the old adage goes. The <A HREF="http://www.ce.org">Consumer Electronics Association</A> and the <A HREF="http://www.nab.org">National Association of Broadcasters</A>, former adversaries in the digital television rollout debacle, have decided to bury the hatchet and begin promoting DTV cooperatively.

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Gary Frisch Posted: Apr 29, 2001 0 comments

G<I>eorge Clooney, Mark Wahlberg, John C. Reilly, Diane Lane, William Fichtner, John Hawkes. Directed by Wolfgang Petersen. Aspect ratio: 2.35:1 (anamorphic). Dolby Digital 5.1. 130 minutes. 2000. Warner Home Video 18584. PG-13. $24.98.</I>

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Jon Iverson Posted: Apr 29, 2001 0 comments

According to <A HREF="http://www.zenith.com">Zenith</A>, the orginator of the VSB digital transmission system behind over-the-air broadcast of DTV and HDTV, "there will be no urban-rural 'digital divide' in the delivery of digital television (DTV) service." The company says that this is thanks in large part to ATSC VSB translators that it has developed.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Apr 29, 2001 0 comments

The idea of watermarking high-resolution audio signals has riled audiophiles for months, ever since Verance announced that the controversial tracking signals would be incorporated into DVD-Audio discs. Now videophiles can get in on the action: last week, <A HREF="http://www.digimarc.com">Digimarc</A> announced that it is partnering with Hitachi, Macrovision, NEC, Philips, Pioneer, and Sony to form the Video Watermarking Group (VWM Group) to provide video copy prevention and play control solutions for digital recording devices.

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