Tom Norton Posted: Sep 19, 2006 5 comments

In addition to their larger Signature V.2 speakers, Paradigm also showed a bookshelf 2-way, the Model S1 at $1600/pair, and this cute UTE center channel, the Model C1, at $900 each. It's not much wider than a big laptop. I'm intrigued by the possibility of using three C1s across the front, if the speaker's horizontal off-axis response is up to the job. The physical layout, with the vertical orientation of the midrange and tweeter (the smallest center channel design I've seen using this arrangement) is a good first step in that direction. As in the other new Signature speakers, these both sport the new Paradigm pure-beryllium tweeter.

Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 19, 2006 0 comments
Auralex Acoustics quietly showed off their latest offering in home theater acoustical treatment. The new SonoSuede System looks great, is designed to be a do-it-yourself project, and is reasonably (as far as room treatment packages go) affordable. Different color combinations are available, and you can custom order other colors if you simply must have something to match that special designer couch you bought. The SonoSuede System package has a suggested retail of $1199.
Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Sep 18, 2006 4 comments
I've posted some more photos from the show in our Galleries.
Maureen Jenson Posted: Sep 18, 2006 1 comments
The guys from Sonic Integrity had arguably one of the hippest things at CEDIA. The Tube Pod--quality Hi Fi for your iPod.
Maureen Jenson Posted: Sep 18, 2006 8 comments
Sim2 showcased their full range of single and three- chip 1080p DLP projectors---including their brand new mac daddy: The three-chip DLP HT5000.
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Chris Chiarella Posted: Sep 18, 2006 0 comments
Mike Inchalik, Vice President of Marketing and Strategy at DTS Digital Images, Talks shop about film restoration.

Most consumers take for granted the awesome video quality of DVD. You might never consider the often decrepit physical condition of many of your favorite classic movies, which were shot on a variety of film stocks and have suffered any number of indignities over the ensuing decades. We discuss restoration frequently in these pages, but many readers want to know more. So, we went to the unrivaled experts. DTS Digital Images—formerly Lowry Digital Images—was founded by the now legendary John Lowry, whose name has become a seal of approval on well over 100 celebrated film restorations. Exclusively for HT, Mike Inchalik of DTS Digital Images pulled back the curtain on their closely guarded, much envied process.

Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 18, 2006 0 comments
Is it possible to improve the greatest invention since the wheel?

If I needed any additional proof of the iPod's ubiquitous nature, I found it the other day when my son pointed out a state trooper with an iPod stuffed into his uniform shirt pocket and telltale white earbuds popped in his ears. I'm sure the trooper was perfectly capable of doing his law-enforcing job whilst enjoying a tune or two, but the thought of state troopers packing iPods gave me pause. What's next? Carthusian monks contemplating God's gift of the click wheel while rocking out to some Gregorian chant?

Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Sep 18, 2006 0 comments
Lasers: They're not just for guns anymore.

If there is one thing that just screams "future" to me, it's lasers. Sure, they've been around since the 1960s, but come on—it's lasers! Right now, they can be found in your CD and DVD players, but a few companies are hoping to put them in your TV, as well.

Chris Chiarella Posted: Sep 18, 2006 0 comments
A portable media player on steroids, and its secret relationship with an HTIB.

I'll admit it. I'm a fan of satellite radio. The sound quality, the variety of programming, the lack of commercials, and even the bonuses like artist and song-title info on display are all enticing to me. And yet, a compelling satellite radio product hasn't landed on my desk in some time—or perhaps one did but was lost among all the press releases, UPS receipts, and slightly used napkins. As if to make up for the lull, Samsung hooked me up with two disparate new products that work great together, converging the freedom of a portable digital audio player with the convenience and versatility of a complete home theater in a box.

Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 18, 2006 2 comments
One awesome box.

To say the Geneva Lab Model XL is merely the largest of the one-piece iPod-compatible speaker systems would be unjust. It is the wildest flight of fancy the iPod has inspired. Plugging your iPod into one is like boarding a 747—you get a distinct feeling that something more powerful than yourself is about to lift you into the air. I must note, however, that the XL looks, sounds, and smells better than any commercial aircraft I've been on.