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Sharp XV-Z30000 3D DLP Video Projector HT Labs Measures

HT Labs Measures

Full-On/Full-Off Contrast Ratio: 8291:1

Except as noted, the results here are for the Sharp’s 2D performance on the Elite 101-inch-wide, 2.35:1 screen (gain 1.1), with the Sharp’s auto iris (Iris2) engaged.

The full-on/full-off contrast ratio can vary, sometimes widely, with the setup conditions—the lamp mode, the zoom setting (which will be determined by the screen size and throw distance), the setting on a projector’s iris, if present, and more. These conditions will be different for different installations. To keep matters under control here, I’ll present two different situations, an idealized but still achievable one, and the setup I used for most of my viewing.

The full-on/full-off contrast ratio result shown at the top of this section was taken under the following conditions: the projector set up to produce a 96-inch-wide picture at a throw distance of 13 feet, 11 inches (this establishes the zoom setting, which affects image peak brightness and contrast), Iris1 (Manual) on High Contrast, Iris2 (Auto) on, Eco+Quiet off (high-lamp mode). This screen size and throw distance combination was chosen because it falls somewhere in the middle of a range of setups that are workable for most users. The Brightness and Contrast controls were then set so that the projector displayed video brightness levels from 17-242 (the video brightness range covers the levels from 16-235, so this setup offers about 3 percent headroom above video white).

Under these conditions, the measured contrast ratio was 8291:1. This number was obtained from peak white and black measurements taken at the lens by a Minolta T-10 illuminance light meter. If we use this contrast ratio together with the peak-white level of 15.81 that these conditions produced on a 96-inch-wide screen, we get a derived black level of 0.0019 foot-lambert. Repeating the measurements with the auto iris turned off reduces the contrast ratio to 1722:1 and increases the black level to 0.0096 ft-L (the peak-white output with the specified settings and the auto iris off was a slightly higher 16.48 ft-L). (Note that my current 1.3-gain StudioTek 130 is smaller than 96 inches wide, but with the peak-white measurement taken only at the center of a white-window test pattern, the image was simply zoomed out to simulate the larger screen.)

The conditions under which I did most of my viewing and measuring, however, were different. I mainly used the 101-inch-wide, 1.1-gain, Elite screen. With the Iris1 (Manual) in High Brightness for this screen, the full-on/full-off contrast ratio measured 4541:1. The corresponding peak-white level was just under 20 ft-L, resulting in a derived black level of 0.0045 ft-L. But in this setup, the Contrast control was set to cover the video-brightness range steps from 17-251, which provided more headroom at the top. Changing Iris1 to High Contrast on this screen and increasing the Contrast control to limit the top-end headroom to 242 (thereby maximizing brightness) resulted in a peak-white level of just under 15 ft-L. With High Contrast in the low-lamp mode (Eco+Quiet On), peak-brightness level dropped to 7.89 ft-L on this screen when set for 3 percent peak-white headroom. But I preferred the High Brightness/high-lamp settings, not only for the enhanced image punch but also for the enhanced headroom.

The color calibration results shown here were also taken on the 101-inch-wide Elite screen. The pre-calibration grayscale Delta E averaged an unimpressive 14.3. With the gamma control on 0, the gamma averaged 2.04—a bit low, but tolerable (the optimum setting varied somewhat with the source material). Post-calibration, the Delta E averaged an exceptional 0.565, and never higher than 1.06. (Delta E is a figure of merit that indicates how close the result comes to the HD standard: Rec. 709. Most experts judge a Delta E of under 3.0 to be visibly indistinguishable from ideal.) The gamma averaged 2.12 in the -1 setting, but with notable variations in the auto-iris mode (such variations are common with auto irises), it dropped below 2.0 in the mid-brightness region before increasing again at the top.

The CIE chart shows the post-calibration color gamut. The average color Delta E was 5.33. Color gamut is the Sharp’s main shortcoming, and as noted in the review, the projector’s very limited color-management system was not used for these results.

Only the post-calibration 3D measurements are shown here. The grayscale Delta E increased to a maximum of 3.37 at 30 percent, 5.64 at 90 percent, and 5.08 at 100 percent brightness, but was never above 2.18 at any other point and averaged a respectable 2.85. The color Delta E averaged 5.2, and the overall 3D color gamut is similar to the 2D gamut.

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COMMENTS
dougri's picture

Did you happen to measure brightness in 3D? How significant is the brightness difference from the BenQ W7000 in 3D (both with decent color and in brightest mode)? The screens used to evaluate the two projectors, while different, should be comparable from a brightness perspective (101 wide 2.35 @ 1.1, vs 120" 16:9 @1.3 gain... given that, one would expect the same image thrown onto the 101" wide screen to be roughly 10% less bright than the 120" screen... is this consistent with the brightness difference, or was the W7000 noticeably brighter in 3D?

dougri's picture

Was the 'film mode' option set to 'auto' or 'off'? It seems odd that the projector would have a 'film mode' intended to handle 24p content properly and simply use 3:2 pulldown to get to 120Hz.

DouglasR's picture

Just took delivery of this unit yesterday. Worked on calibrating it most of the night (calman, i1pro, C6, DPG2000) There is no additional software in the box or on the sharp site. The stuff built in is the same as what is listed in the users guide no not updated. I called the service center and they didn't know anything about it (not surprising) The 1 point WB works rather well as you stated, however the custom gamma adjustments caused severe posterization with only minor use. Prior to calibration a 21 point gray gradient was displayed with red banding. This did not improve after calibration Opening the iris did help a little with the banding but need the iris closed. Please, can you help me get hold of this software or new firmware or something? I will have to resell this new projector, the 8 year old HC3000 that it is replacing looks many times better.

DouglasR's picture

Just took delivery of this unit yesterday. Worked on calibrating it most of the night (calman, i1pro, C6, DPG2000) There is no additional software in the box or on the sharp site. The stuff built in is the same as what is listed in the users guide no not updated. I called the service center and they didn't know anything about it (not surprising) The 1 point WB works rather well as you stated, however the custom gamma adjustments caused severe posterization with only minor use. Prior to calibration a 21 point gray gradient was displayed with red banding. This did not improve after calibration Opening the iris did help a little with the banding but need the iris closed. Please, can you help me get hold of this software or new firmware or something? I will have to resell this new projector, the 8 year old HC3000 that it is replacing looks many times better.

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