LATEST ADDITIONS

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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Jul 22, 2013 0 comments
I’ve been sampling a variety of soundbars lately, ranging in price from $300 to $3,900. Despite the generic term – “soundbar” or “surround bar” – it’s actually a very diverse and interesting category with all sorts of subcategories within the soundbar umbrella: active, passive, LCR-only, LCR plus discrete rears, and etc. It’s also a category that can arouse understandably strong emotions of disgust and disdain among purists and quite a few custom installers. For millions of people, however, simplicity usually trumps sound quality; and the soundbar tsunami continues to swell and is unlikely to crest anytime soon.

But the pencil-thin form factor of flat-panel TVs is at odds with the acoustic principles speaker engineers currently take advantage of. The result is a shotgun marriage of something that is skinny with a partner that is usually a bit bigger-boned. Both of the home-theater spouses, though, do share a common aspect. Each one performs best when viewed/listened to from a position directly in front of the it. And therein lies a problem: what do you do with the soundbar if you turn the flat-panel on its base or otherwise change the angle of the TV (if it’s mounted on a tilting, pivoting, or full-motion wall mount from, for example, companies such as OmniMount, Triple Play designs from Bell’O, or Sanus)? In a more extreme case, what’s to be done with the soundbar if the TV is mounted in a corner?

Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Jul 19, 2013 1 comments

W3 On-Wall Soundbar System
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Subseries 200 Subwoofer
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Price: $3,046 At A Glance: Adjustable-angle feet for tabletop or shelf mounting • Passive radiators augment bass output • W1s can be used vertically or horizontally

What do you say about a product when there’s nothing special to talk about? Let’s take, for instance, the hypothetical case of a passive LCR soundbar, a pair of matching on-wall speakers for the surrounds, and a powered subwoofer. Pretty staid and traditional stuff, that. After all, it’s a passive LCR, so there’s no extraordinary amplification technology involving cutting-edge DSP crossover and frequency manipulation in order to extract better sound out of embarrassingly small drivers than ever was possible (or desirable) before. There’s no wireless subwoofer connection to delve into, no HDMI connectivity, no onscreen display—hell, there’s not even a destined-to-disappear teeny-tiny remote control to complain about. Perhaps most disappointing from a reviewer’s perspective is the lack of any unique mess-with-your-mind faux-surround processing to wallow in the minutia of—no hyper-temporal, quasi-spatial, time-dilating series of intermodal cross-connections that takes a beautifully designed discrete multichannel soundtrack, scrambles all the elements together as if they were eggs destined for the warmed-over breakfast buffet line at Country Kitchen, but then presents it in a way that makes the end result appear (in your head) to be a delectable plate of fried eggs, sunny side up and steaming hot next to a couple of strips of crispy bacon fresh from the frying pan.

Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jul 18, 2013 0 comments

Andrew Jones is the Director of Speaker Engineering at TAD and Pioneer, and was Chief Engineer at both Infinity and KEF. He shares with us a song from his soundtrack.

"Let's face it, I'm a geek. I got into Hi-Fi because I love science and technology. I never had any doubts since my early years that I wanted to do something in the sciences, I just didn't know exactly what. Then my brother and I were given an old Dansette all in one record player and a stack of old 45's as a birthday present. Bingo! That started my obsession with both music, and the science of reproducing it.

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HT Staff Posted: Jul 18, 2013 0 comments
Marantz today announced that it is adding two models to its M-CR Series of wireless network receivers. The M-CR510 and M-CR610 support internet radio, music streaming services, and content from home networks, mobile devices and other sources. Both models are available now at $599 and $699, respectively.

David Vaughn Posted: Jul 18, 2013 1 comments
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Price: $150 At A Glance: Unique design • Middling Web browser with built-in Wi-Fi • Extremely loud disc loading

Every year a new generation of Blu-ray players hits the market from the major electronics manufacturers. While 3D was the last big advancement to hit the streets, the latest rage is 4K upconversion in the flagship players, but you won’t find that on the budget-friendly Samsung BD-F5900. What you will get for $150 is a 3D-capable player with a plethora of streaming options, a built-in Web browser, and Wi-Fi capability. With all these goodies, is there a reason to pay more for a Blu-ray player? Read on and see…

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Jul 18, 2013 0 comments
AmTRAN Video Corp., the company now producing TVs under the JVC brand, has announced four new JVC flat-panel TVs in sizes ranging from 42 to 55 inches, at prices ranging from $799 to $999. All feature a slim bezel design and edge-lit LED backlighting with local dimming.
Thomas J. Norton Posted: Jul 18, 2013 0 comments
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James P. “Sulley” Sullivan is the pride of Monsters, Inc., the power company for Monstropolis. As Sulley and the other Monster scarers pass through doors leading into children’s bedrooms, the energy generated by kids’ screams is captured and stored. Sulley is the champion scarer, and Mike Wazowski is his coach, right-hand monster, and best pal.
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Corey Gunnestad Posted: Jul 18, 2013 1 comments
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In early November 1979, a mob of hostile Iranian extremists stormed the U.S. embassy and took 52 American hostages and held them captive for 444 days. Seconds before the Iranians seized control of the embassy, six American officials managed to escape and find refuge at the residence of a Canadian ambassador. When the absence of the six Americans is discovered, an intense search for them ensues. Once found, they will almost certainly be executed publicly as spies.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Jul 18, 2013 0 comments
7113ama.jpgLongtime Amazon customers may already be surprised to find CD purchases from years and years ago appearing in their Amazon Cloud Players. Their eyebrows are set to move even higher now that Amazon is extending the courtesy to LP purchases. Buy an AutoRip-eligible disc—analog or digital—from the online retailer, boot up the Cloud Player, and there it is. If your computer or tablet of choice lacks a disc drive, as increasingly many do, you’re also free to download a free 256-kbps AutoRipped copy. The feature is available to U.S. customers only, for titles displaying the AutoRip logo.
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HT Staff Posted: Jul 17, 2013 0 comments
Amar G. Bose, the MIT-educated electrical engineer who founded Bose Corp. in 1964 and built it into a private multi-billion-dollar empire spanning home, personal, professional, and automotive audio products, died Friday July 12. He was 83.

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