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Daniel Kumin Posted: Jun 26, 2001 0 comments

When this magazine's predecessor, Stereo Review, evaluated Energy's Take 5 system some four years ago, micro-size home theater speaker systems weren't too common.

Daniel Kumin Posted: Nov 10, 2010 0 comments
Key Features
$3,600 (as tested) bostonacoustics.com
• RS 334 tower speaker ($1,400/pair): vented enclosure; (4) 4-in cone woofers, 1-in soft-dome “coupled dual-concentric” tweeter; 42 in high; 32 ¼ lb
Daniel Kumin Posted: Jun 15, 2008 0 comments
Klipsch's XF-48: Strong, Slim, and Sexy XP-48 Klipsch XF-48 Klipsch began making high-performance speakers well before the advent of the transistor, so when it unveils an all-new flagship design, the world pays
Daniel Kumin Posted: Jan 30, 2012 1 comments

How long have Integra’s A/V preamplifier/processors been around? Long enough to become a bit of an institution among home theater insiders. If you were assembling a serious system and demanded legitimately audio/videophile performance in every aspect but were unable or unwilling to pay the sometimes absurd prices asked for “seriously high-end” gear, an Integra pre/pro is what you bought.

Daniel Kumin Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments
The Short Form
$999 / US.MARANTZ.COM
Snapshot
Daniel Kumin Posted: Feb 13, 2013 0 comments

Everybody loves small speakers, and why not? Smaller is — often — easier to afford, easier to schlep home, easier to place, and easier to live with. Smaller also has certain acoustical advantages in achieving smooth response and in yielding the broad, even spread of sound that favors good imaging and an open, believable tone color.

But how small is too small? Some say there’s no limit, and at least one manufacturer (Bose) has had success with subwoofer/satellite designs whose sats are smaller than a pepper mill, let alone a breadbox. But as the front satellites of a speaker system become smaller, their ability to reproduce bass low enough to bridge effectively with the practical upper limits of a single subwoofer, at around 150 Hz (and ideally lower), becomes questionable.

Klipsch thinks it has found the sweet spot with its HD Theater 600 system

Daniel Kumin Posted: Dec 02, 2006 0 comments

The Sony STR-DA5200ES presented no surprises. Power was generous in all tests save all-channels-driven, where the receiver topped out at 66 watts all around; note that this is only 4 or 5 dB less than from the most powerful receivers we've tested on the demanding all-channels-driven test.

Daniel Kumin Posted: Nov 09, 2003 0 comments

Photos by Tony Cordoza As I unpacked Athena Technologies' Audition Series home theater speakers, I recalled that Athena was the Greek goddess of wisdom, reason, and purity. Was it wise and reasonable, I wondered, to expect purity of sound from a six-piece system that costs less than $1,500? If anyone could make such a system, though, I figured Athena could.

Daniel Kumin Posted: Jan 26, 2011 0 comments

There's a trend afoot in A/V-land to make even Flagship receivers simpler (at least on the outside), easier to use, and physically more compact and less intimidating. Now Yamaha has boarded this bus, not just with a single model but with an entire new family of AVRs it's calling Aventage (rhymes with fromage). Cheesy names aside, the news here is that, for once, "new and improved" really is: new form factor, new user interface, new network-ability, new remote control, and lots of new (or at least evolved) audio and video technology.

Filed under
Daniel Kumin Posted: Apr 18, 2002 0 comments

There once was a time when audio/video components didn't have USB or Ethernet ports. When "kilobits per second" was not a hi-fi term. When a kid who stumbled over a stack of LPs in a dumpster actually knew what they were.

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