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Al Griffin Posted: Nov 04, 2007 0 comments
Pioneer Kuro PDP-5010FD 50-inch plasma HDTV 12562864785 Pioneer PDP-5010FD While most TV manufacturers have struggled through the years to deliver acceptable black levels in their flat-panel TVs, Pioneer cruised ov
Al Griffin Posted: Aug 26, 2004 0 comments

After half a decade of struggling to attract eyeballs, high-definition TV (HDTV) has turned the corner at last. A lot of people have moved beyond wondering if they should spring for an HDTV to asking themselves, "Which one should I buy?" If you've been pondering the same question, it's time to get a grip on the different types of big-screen HDTVs.

Al Griffin Posted: Dec 18, 2012 0 comments

When it comes to picture quality, LCD TVs ?with a full-array, “local dimming” LED backlight tend to outperform their edge-lit LED brethren by a not insubstantial margin. We’ve covered the particulars of LED backlight tech before, so I won’t get sidetracked in explaining it here, but the finer control afforded by a full-array design allows for improved contrast and, for the most part, better uniformity when displaying dark images. Sony was among the first TV makers to push full-array for LCD, and then mysteriously put the tech on hold. But it roared back in 2011 with the XBR-HX929 line, a series that pushed full-array to new heights. The newest such sets to arrive from Sony are the HX950 series, which started shipping in late 2012. Can they match, or even exceed, Sony’s vaunted HX929 TVs?

Al Griffin Posted: Nov 02, 2006 0 comments

Color temperature (Warm2 color temperature before/after calibration): 20 IRE: N/A 30 IRE: 5,470/5,878 K 40 IRE: 5,840/6,531 K 50 IRE: 6,056/6,441 K 60 IRE: 6,275/6,520 K 70 IRE: 6,304/6,661 K 80 IRE: 6,263/6,547 K 90 IRE: 6,359/6,489 K 100 IRE: 5,789/6,298 K Brightness (100-IRE window before/after calibration): 36.0/34.4 ftL

Al Griffin Posted: Oct 16, 2001 0 comments

When progressive-scan DVD players first emerged almost two years ago, the already excellent picture quality we'd come to expect from standard players suddenly got a whole lot better. That's because the new models could convert video signals to a progressive-scan format for display on a TV or monitor with progressive-scan capabilities.

Al Griffin Posted: Apr 05, 2013 0 comments

Housed in a billet-like slab of aluminum, the HRT microStreamer’s clean, utilitarian design tips you off right away that it means business. In this case, that biz is performing the same basic tasks as the Dragonfly, including decoding files with up to 96 kHz/24-bit resolution. And at a mere 2.5 inches, it checks in for work in a similarly compact form factor.

Al Griffin Posted: Jan 01, 2007 0 comments

Color temperature (User Mode/Low Color Temperature): 20 IRE: N/A 30 IRE: 6,576 K 40 IRE: 7,301 K 50 IRE: 6,951 K 60 IRE: 6,610 K 70 IRE: 6,561 K 80 IRE: 6,437 K 90 IRE: 6,684 K 100 IRE: 6,617 K Brightness (100-IRE window): 50.4 ftL

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Al Griffin Posted: Jun 18, 2008 0 comments

Q. I've been using separates in my surround system for some time and have a collection of high-end amplifiers. But the surround processing modes, HDMI connectivity, and video upconversion on my preamp/processor are now out of date. New receivers seem to have the latest technology at a much more reasonable price than most of the pre/pros with similar attributes.

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Al Griffin Posted: Apr 08, 2010 0 comments

Just days before boarding a plane in January for the 2010 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, I made a point of doing something that many other folks the world over had been doing in droves: I watched Avatar at my local IMAX 3D theater. And I don’t think I’m alone in saying that it was the most involving 3D movie I’d ever seen. The distinct illusion of depth conveyed by the image projected on that massive IMAX screen was an entirely new sensation. In many ways, Avatar was the greatest movie experience I’d ever sat through.

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Al Griffin Posted: Jan 09, 2002 0 comments
A videophile's dream is realized at the Fujitsu booth, where a school of widescreen plasma TVs wows onlookers.
High-definition TV (HDTV) received some strong nudges in the right direction during the past year, so we expected to see plentiful signs of life on the show floor i

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