Al Griffin

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Al Griffin Posted: Apr 04, 2008 0 comments

The catch phrase "flat TV" has been circulating for years, mainly to describe the many flat-panel plasma and LCD sets that have swamped the market. But with an average cabinet depth of 3 to 5 inches, can those TVs really be called flat? To find a truly flat display, you need to check out OLED (Organic Light-Emitting Diode).

Al Griffin Posted: May 03, 2007 0 comments

Color temperature (Cinema Image Profile, Low Color Temperature before/User Image Profile/Color Temperature after calibration): 20 IRE: 7,411/6,656 K 30 IRE: 6,943/6,526 K 40 IRE: 6,846/6,535 K 50 IRE: 6,840/6,456 K 60 RE: 6,776/6,411 K 70 IRE: 6,761/6,422 K 80 IRE: 6,768/6,440 K 90 IRE: 6,711/6,374 K 100 IRE: 6,700/6,370 K Brightness (100-IRE window before/afte

Filed under
Al Griffin Posted: Jul 30, 2009 0 comments

When the Blu-ray Disc format was first announced, a feature that industry execs liked to pimp in their PowerPoint presentations was BD-Live. With your player plugged into a home network, we were told, a BD-Live-enabled disc could access all manner of wonders by way of the Internet -things like games and extra scenes and commentaries not included on the original disc.

Al Griffin Posted: Aug 29, 2011 0 comments

While 3D movies haven’t totally taken over the multiplex, the format remains a force to be reckoned with. Michael Bay just released a new Transformers installment in 3D (Transformers: Dark of the Moon), James Cameron is at work on Avatar sequels, and the entire Star Wars saga is being formatted for 3D release.

Al Griffin Posted: Jan 28, 2011 0 comments

As anyone who saw Avatar in 3D at a theater (especially an IMAX theater) can attest, it set a high bar for depth-enhanced cinema. And for people like me fortunate enough to have had access to a 3D TV in 2010, each of the meager disc offerings squeezed out by the studios inevitably stood in comparison with that benchmark experience. With few exceptions, all fell well short of my Avatar-fueled expectations.

Al Griffin Posted: Apr 02, 2006 0 comments

By now, LCD technology has all but taken over the small-screen TV category. You can still buy a small traditional tube set, but most folks looking for a TV to stick in a bedroom or kids' play area will find LCD more appealing. The main reason, of course, is the space-saving flat-panel screen.

Filed under
Al Griffin Posted: May 15, 2002 0 comments

Compared with the "in the lab" box for one of our test reports on, say, an A/V receiver, the lab data for a TV review may seem skimpy. While there aren't a lot of numbers, the ones we do generate can give you a pretty good idea of what to expect from the set - particularly its color reproduction, which is arguably the most important aspect of a TV's performance.

Al Griffin Posted: Sep 15, 2003 0 comments

Photos by Tony Cordoza The good old cathode-ray tube (CRT) is up against some stiff competition these days. Leading the charge are sexy flat-panel plasma and LCD TVs that can be mounted on the wall like a picture.

Filed under
Al Griffin Posted: Apr 19, 2012 0 comments

Back before the development of 33 1/3-rpm vinyl records (those things that DJ types and a few of us here at Sound+Vision collect) and CDs, people used to listen to music using something called the 78, a 10-inch disc format that spun at 78 revolutions per minute and was made from a variety of materials during its lifespan, including rubber, shellac, and, ultimately, vin

Filed under
Al Griffin Posted: Jul 05, 2006 0 comments

The New World (New Line; Movie •••½, Picture/Sound ••••, Extras •••), Terrence Malick's film about the fateful collision of English settlers with Native Americans in 1607, is short on dialogue and long on trippy shots of sunlight leaking through virgin forests.

Pages

X
Enter your Sound & Vision username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading