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Daniel Kumin Posted: Dec 31, 1988 0 comments

Pioneer's latest A/V receiver produced uniformly excellent bench results: linearity and S/N were close to perfect on both PCM and Dolby Digital signals, while distortion and frequency response were nearly as good (the latter, in particular, on 96/24 PCM).

Daniel Kumin Posted: Dec 02, 2006 0 comments

The Sony STR-DA5200ES presented no surprises. Power was generous in all tests save all-channels-driven, where the receiver topped out at 66 watts all around; note that this is only 4 or 5 dB less than from the most powerful receivers we've tested on the demanding all-channels-driven test.

Daniel Kumin Posted: Jul 04, 1988 0 comments

DOLBY DIGITAL PERFORMANCE

Daniel Kumin Posted: Jan 01, 2007 0 comments

I encountered no glitches or surprises while testing the Sunfire Theater Grand Receiver 3. Power output was consistently among the highest I have measured from a multichannel receiver, and its 165 watts (22.2 dBW) per channel with 5 channels driven represents a clear benchmark for the category (3 to 4 dB greater than flagship receivers from many other manufacturers achieve).

Daniel Kumin Posted: Dec 03, 1988 0 comments

Yamaha's RX-V1800 yielded the fine technical performance usual from the firm's A/V receivers. Power exceeded its specs by a good margin and bettered 100 watts all around, even with 5 channels driven.

Daniel Kumin Posted: Jun 03, 2007 0 comments

DOLBY DIGITAL PERFORMANCE

Daniel Kumin Posted: Apr 13, 2011 0 comments

Quick, name a Canadian A/V receiver maker! Yeah, I couldn’t either — until now. Anthem, the north-of-the-border firm best known for its “Statement” Series reference-grade A/V preamp (and power amps), has finally merged the two forms into a single new element: the MRX family of A/V receivers.

Daniel Kumin Posted: Sep 16, 2010 0 comments

I’ve seen plenty of loudspeaker “breakthroughs” in my half-a-lifetime around the audio sideshow, including speakers shaped like ears, tubas, and croquet balls. And there have also been “revolutionary” new driver designs that resembled stars, chafing dishes, and origami.

Daniel Kumin Posted: Mar 22, 2012 0 comments

It’s a fact of modern life. The higher you climb in the high end of anything, the less, at least in one sense, you will get. You will find, I believe, few gargoyles on buildings designed by I.M. Pei, and even fewer rear-seat DVD screens in Paganis.

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Daniel Kumin Posted: Nov 20, 2012 0 comments

Most A/V receivers with any pretensions toward high performance — and most audio and video products in general, for that matter — are designed and marketed for hardcore hobbyists, not average consumers. What’s the difference? The hobbyist revels in scores of setup options, dozens of surround modes, and fistfuls of video-processing choices.

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