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Al Griffin Posted: Jan 06, 2014 1 comments
With 2013 being the year of the OLED—sorry, Ultra HDTV—it comes as a surprise to find that Samsung’s 2014 TV lineup lacks a new OLED model (though the 55-inch KN55S9C Sound & Vision recently reviewed carries over into 2014). What did Samsung have to announce at CES? Plenty of Ultra HDTVs in all manner of screen sizes with both curved and non-curved (flat, that is) screens.
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Al Griffin Posted: Oct 03, 2006 0 comments

Aside from a huge, costly flat-panel TV, the easiest way to put a big video image up on your wall is to buy a front-projector/projection screen combo. And with good high-rez front projectors now selling for as little as $2,000, that option can be particularly budget-friendly.

Al Griffin Posted: Jun 26, 2001 0 comments

Television is something we all know and love -- sometimes without good reason. Critics routinely argue that shows like Temptation Island and WWF Smackdown! have pushed us several steps down the evolutionary ladder, but people still watch them. One thing that has evolved is the technology for displaying video images.

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Al Griffin Posted: Feb 18, 2016 4 comments
Got a tech question for Sound & Vision? Email us at AskSandV@gmail.com

Q I’m on a vinyl kick. I recently purchased an Audio-Technica LP120 USB turntable and am converting a few of my old LPs. I have it connected to a Sony AVR and am listening through my Klipsch Reference RB-5II bookshelf speakers. Now I’m thinking about searching for a vintage amp or receiver. I’ve read good things about the Marantz 1060 integrated amp (circa 1975), which is rated at 30 watts per channel. I also hear good things about some of the old Pioneer gear. I want to crank old classic rock, and I know the RB-5IIs can handle it. Any suggestions on what I should set my sights on? — Lew Collins/Via e-mail

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Al Griffin Posted: Jan 11, 2014 0 comments
The two biggest TV trends happening at CES are higher-than-HDTV resolution and ultra-large screens. According to Sanus, both trends mean that heavier-duty-than-normal mounts will be required to deal with the increased weight of the larger, higher-rez screens.
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Al Griffin Posted: Mar 10, 2016 2 comments
Got a tech question for Sound & Vision? Email us at AskSandV@gmail.com

Q I own a Sony BDP-BX57 Blu-ray player that can play SACDs. I also own a Pioneer VSX-820-K AV receiver that can only decode two-channel DSD signals from SACDs via its HDMI inputs. To get the best performance when playing multichannel SACDs, should I set the HDMI output on the Blu-ray player to bitstream? Also, which of the following listening modes on the AVR should I choose: Auto Surround, Direct, or Pure Direct? —Chris Murphy / via e-mail

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Al Griffin Posted: Aug 10, 2015 4 comments
Got a tech question for Sound & Vision? Email us at AskSandV@gmail.com

Q How would I go about setting up multiple surround speakers in the same channel—two side left and two side right speakers, for example—as in a commercial movie theater? One more question: If I used a Y splitter and additional amplifiers to power the speakers, could I still employ Audyssey processing to calibrate the speakers? I am planning to build a home theater with two to three rows of seating. —William Lee / via e-mail

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Al Griffin Posted: Sep 15, 2016 Published: Sep 16, 2016 0 comments
Yes, that image above is of a projection screen in dark room—a common sight here at CEDIA. What you’re actually looking at is a Kaleidescape server menu displayed on the TAM-1T, a new variable aspect ratio projection screen from Seymour-Screen Excellence.
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Al Griffin Posted: Jan 07, 2007 0 comments

January 8, 2007 - Sharp introduced its latest products against the backdrop of a 108-inch LCD HDTV - the world's largest. No price (or model) was given for the prototype, but expect it to exceed your budget if and when the gargantuan panel makes it to production.

Al Griffin Posted: Nov 01, 2004 0 comments

Although flat-panel LCD TVs have been hanging around even longer than plasma models, their small-size screens have garnered less attention. But things changed in the past year: LCD TVs started zooming up in size, undoing the myth that the technology is good only for small displays in the kitchen, bedroom, or office.

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