Al Griffin

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Al Griffin Posted: Sep 03, 2006 0 comments

Color temperature (User preset/Warm Color Temp before calibration / User preset/Normal Color Temp after calibration): Low window (30 IRE): 6,171/6,745 K High window (80 IRE): 8,044/6,514 K Brightness (100-IRE window before/after calibration): 58.4.6/47.5 ftL

Al Griffin Posted: May 11, 2006 0 comments

Color temperature (User mode before/after calibration): Low window (20-IRE): 6,220/6,425 K High window (80-IRE): 6,472/6,517 K Brightness (100-IRE window before/after calibration): 48.7/37.5 ftL

Al Griffin Posted: Dec 04, 2006 0 comments

Color temperature (Movie preset before/Custom preset after): 20 IRE: 9,412 K/5,667 K 30 IRE: 9,477 K/6,333 K 40 IRE: 9,804 K/6,518 K 50 IRE: 9,970 K/6,403 K 60 IRE: 10,042 K/6,421 K 70 IRE: 10,068 K/6,577 K 80 IRE: 10,102 K/6,558 K 90 IRE: 10,139 K/6,605 K 100 IRE: 10,193 K/6,657 K Brightness (100-IRE window before/after): 46.3/33.6 ftL

Al Griffin Posted: Jun 04, 2006 0 comments

Color temperature (Color 1 preset before/after calibration): Low window (30 IRE): 7,438/6,758 K High window (80 IRE): 6,833/6,355 K Brightness (100-IRE window before/after calibration): 61.1/40.4 ftL

Al Griffin Posted: Jan 26, 2011 0 comments

The writer F. Scott Fitzgerald famously said there are no second acts in American lives. But what about third acts? Speaker impresario Sandy Gross is a cofounder of two of the best-known companies in the home theater/audio biz: Polk Audio and Definitive Technology.

Al Griffin Posted: Jul 13, 2011 0 comments

At 3D theaters, you’re handed lightweight passive glasses that work in tandem with a polarizing filter positioned over the projector’s lens. When viewing at home with a 3D TV, you use bulky, battery-powered glasses with active shutter liquid-crystal lenses. Passive glasses in theaters are cheap and easily replaced. But at an average cost of $100 per pair, glasses used at home represent a sizable investment. Better to put them in a safe place — and keep ’em away from kids!

Al Griffin Posted: Sep 16, 2010 0 comments

For some, 3D TV’s arrival came on a bit too suddenly. Avatar was still lighting up theater screens when the first 3D sets checked in to tempt us with the promise of stereoscopic golf tournaments — as if that alone was reason enough to buy a new TV. But while it’s easy to dismiss the whole matter as a marketing-driven phenomenon, even the most cynical consumer would be foolish to not at least consider the possibility that they might one day want to watch things in 3D.

Al Griffin Posted: Oct 16, 2012 0 comments

For a company whose supposed emphasis is LCD TV manufacturing, LG sure makes some good plasmas. Its 50PZ950, which we reviewed in the September 2011 issue, earned a Certified & Recommended stamp, both for its accurate, eminently tweakable picture and for its innovative Magic Motion remote-controlled “Smart” GUI. New for 2012 is the 50PM9700, which follows in its predecessor’s footsteps by being THX 3D-certified, Smart, and also Magic Motion remote-controlled. There are a number of other differences between the two models, but here’s one that immediately stands out: At $1,299, the 50PM9700 sells for about $300 less than the 50PZ950.

Al Griffin Posted: Jun 11, 2008 0 comments

The Short Form

Al Griffin Posted: Jan 27, 2011 0 comments

When I first checked out one of Mitsubishi's Unisen "Immersive Sound" LCD TVs (the LT-46153, reviewed here), I was struck by the ingenuity of mounting a full-featured soundbar into the set's cabinet. And when I eventually connected a subwoofer to the TV, powered it up, and let a movie rip, I was floored by the room-filling sound - something you don't expect from a flat-panel model.

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