NEW PRODUCTS

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Peter Pachal Posted: Apr 03, 2007 0 comments

YOU'RE SO MONEY A few short years ago, a 50-inch plasma TV was a toy of the super-rich, reserved for those who could drop as much coin on a set as their kids' college tuition. At $2,500, Hitachi's P50H401 HD plasma heralds a new era, where bigscreens are within reach of ... well, at least someone you know.

Michael Berk Posted: Sep 23, 2011 0 comments

Been looking for a portable speaker system to go along with your iOS device? iHome's long-awaited iW1 battery-powered AirPlay speaker is finally here. The iW1 was one of the first announced AirPlay speakers - and while it was slow out of the gate, it's now set to be the first available truly wireless AirPlay device.

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Doug Newcomb Posted: Sep 04, 2006 0 comments

Americans love trucks. Whether they're for carrying stuff, commuting, or just cruising, pickups are so popular that they've been the best-selling vehicles in the US for almost 30 years. For this installment of System Builder, we picked the '06 Dodge Ram 1500 ST Quad Cab (sticker price: $22,050) for an audio-system makeover.

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SV Staff Posted: Jun 26, 2001 0 comments

JVC

Prep for the future with JVC's RX-9010VBK digital surround receiver. Rated to deliver 120 watts to each of five channels, it has such forward-looking features as a front-panel USB port and an extended frequency response, rated from 7 Hz to 50 kHz ±3 dB, to handle the wider bandwidth of DVD-Audio.

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Michael Berk Posted: Mar 22, 2012 0 comments

Affordable audiophile and home-theater gear leaders Emotiva have announced the new XMC-1, the first product to emerge in a revamped lineup of digital products from the company, designed by Moog and B&K veteran digital systems wizard and Emotiva VP of Engineering Ray Dennison.

Michael Berk Posted: Jul 20, 2011 0 comments

The cat's been out of the bag for a month or two now, but today Roku officially announces an entirely redesigned line of streaming media players, featuring a smaller form factor, a few new content channels, Angry Birds - and, on the top-of-the-line XS, a motion-control remote. The new units should hit stores by the end of the month.

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Peter Pachal Posted: Apr 02, 2006 0 comments

Sure, the Onkyo CS-V720 minisystem ($400) is willing and able to serve as a DVD/CD player, but this sleek little number doesn't merely spin discs. It's also XM radio-ready, which means that when you get an XM Connect & Play antenna ($20) and a subscription to the satellite service ($12.95 a month), 160 channels of music, sports, news, and more will be at your fingertips.

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Ken Richardson Posted: Oct 31, 2006 0 comments

DirecTV's Titanium plan gives you everything the satcaster offers: up to 10 receivers, more than 250 regular and HD channels, unlimited pay-per-view (without paying for it), 70 XM satellite radio channels, "personalized concierge customer service, 24/7," and more.

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SV Staff Posted: Jan 13, 2003 0 comments
Harman Kardon Master of the digital domain-Harman Kardon's DPR 1001 Digital Path Receiver is designed to keep digital signals digital right up to the final output stage. It's rated to deliver 50 watts each to seven channels and can decode Dolby Digital EX and DTS-ES soundtracks.
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Rob Medich Posted: Apr 03, 2006 0 comments

Yes, it's two, two radios in one: the style is retro, but the technology is Space Age. Debuting at the Consumer Electronics Show and set for a spring launch, this tabletop model from Crosley offers AM and FM, but it's the company's first product equipped for XM satellite radio - hence its name, Explorer 1 ($250).

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SV Staff Posted: Apr 29, 2004 0 comments

Toshiba When it comes to recording TV shows, Toshiba's RD-XS32 gives you plenty of options: you can store them on the 80-gigabyte (GB) hard disk for a short stay, give them a permanent home on a write-once DVD-R, or burn them onto an erasable DVD-RW or DVD-RAM disc.

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Mar 04, 2013 0 comments

It's kind of amazing that a component that hasn't changed much outwardly for 20+ years can change so much internally in the course of just a couple of years. I'm talking about Pioneer's surround-sound receivers, which I first encountered in 1989 ... and which still looked almost exactly the same when I walked into the demo room at the company's Long Beach, Calif., headquarters last week to check out its four new affordable models.

But they don't work the same. The new receviers, priced from $249 to $599, are even more packed with technology than the generation they replace. Fortunately, though, Pioneer's taking some steps to help consumers deal with all that complexity.

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Doug Newcomb Posted: Jun 02, 2006 0 comments

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