AUDIO VIDEO NEWS

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Jon Iverson Posted: Jan 06, 2002 0 comments

The 2002 Consumer Electronics Show officially opens Tuesday, January 8th, but several major manufacturers took advantage of the relative peace to host press conferences on Monday.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Jan 08, 2002 0 comments

We've moved to the Alexis Park, home of specialty audio. Traffic here is light, and there aren't many home theater demonstrations. We have seen some compelling new products, however&mdash;such as <A HREF="http://www.niro.net">Niroson</A>'s prototype surround-sound system consisting of only two small speakers and a compact subwoofer.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Jan 07, 2002 0 comments

Samsung is making a major push on several fronts, including DVD, hard disk, and flat screen technologies. One of the more intriguing prototypes on display at the LV Convention Center is the company's DVD player/hard-disk recorder combo, whose 50GB drive can accommodate up to 20 movies. The films can be saved in a compressed video format directly off DVD and watched as often as you like. There is no digital output on the machine (it does have analog component video out) so there is no easy way to make digital copies. Like TiVo's PVR, the Samsung recorder will require deleting some recordings when the disk is full. The fact that the recordings are not transportable helps Samsung skirt copyright issues, according to a representative.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Jan 10, 2003 0 comments

Runco has made great strides in projector development recently. The Union City, CA&ndash;based company unveiled three new DLP projectors in Las Vegas, all of them sporting single 16:9 HD2 chips, DVI inputs, and 1280 x 720 resolution. The least expensive of the three, the Reflection CL-720, supports the primary varieties of NTSC, PAL, and SECAM, and can be ordered from the factory with a short throw or long throw lens, for images as small as 40" diagonally or up to as large as 300". Brightness is specified at 750 ANSI Lumens when the projector is calibrated for home theater; contrast ratio is a very respectable 1500:1. The CL-720 is said to be "HDTV ready," although the product sheet handed out at the LV Convention Center doesn't list any ATSC format among those supported.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Jan 07, 2003 0 comments

<I>Bigger, better, more.</I> That's the future as envisioned by technological giants Zenith Electronics Corporation and Royal Philips Electronics, which kicked off this year's edition of the world's largest trade show with huge flatscreen television sets and plans to make technological interconnectivity deeper and more seamless than it has ever been for the average citizen.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Jan 09, 2003 0 comments

This year's CES makes one thing abundantly clear: Large cathode-ray displays are dead. There are virtually no big CRT monitors or television sets being shown here. Synonymous with the 20th century, CRTs are the electronics industry's dinosaurs.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Jan 09, 2003 0 comments

On Thursday, the first <I>official</I> day of CES, attendees were treated to another day of warm, dry weather&mdash;and a mind-boggling array of new home theater products.

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Posted: Jul 06, 2003 0 comments

Digital television continues to gain momentum.

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Posted: Jan 26, 2003 0 comments

At this year's Consumer Electronics Show (CES), the <I>Stereophile Guide to Home Theater</I> hosted a ceremony and breakfast for the 2003 Editors' Choice award winners. The winners are pictured below with Editor Thomas J. Norton.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Jan 09, 2004 0 comments

"This," said Lew Johnson, "is home theater done the way <I>we</I> think it ought to be." The "we" in question was Conrad-Johnson and its sister company McCormack Audio, and the system under discussion included McCormack's spanking new UDP-1 Universal Disc Player ($2995).

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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Jan 09, 2005 0 comments
One of the main reasons why dealers and press types come to the Consumer Electronics Show every year is to see first hand the just-released and soon-to-be-released electronic gadgets and home entertainment gear. But, if you've got "connections", the best thing about CES - other than free dinners and drinks - is the chance to get an up close and personal look at technology that's still in the development stage. These "revealing" meetings generally take place in an unassuming hotel room off the beaten path, are bereft of any glowing press releases, and require a secret handshake (or sometimes a signed non-disclosure agreement) to gain access. HP, for example, showed us some things that we could tell you about, but we'd lose the ability to use our knee caps if we did. (I'm just kidding about the knee caps, but we did swear ourselves to secrecy until they're ready to let the electronic cat out of the bag.)
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Jan 09, 2005 0 comments

<B>Thomas J. Norton</B><BR>
Finally, news from the audio side of CES. My coverage of the limited surround-sound demos at the official specialty audio venue of the Alexis Park Hotel will have to wait for our upcoming in-depth show report. Today's report will catch up on a few important demos held at hotels near the Las Vegas convention center, plus one surprise discovery at the Alexis. And the news it hot.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Jan 05, 2005 0 comments

CES doesn't officially open until Thursday, January 6, but for the horde of assembled press, it begins on January 5. While workers swarm over the Las Vegas Nevada convention center in what appears to be a hopeless attempt to have everything ready by Thursday's official opening, wall-to-wall press conferences are being held. Tolerated as a necessary chore by the scribes, the press conferences nevertheless serve a useful purpose for manufacturers, giving them a captive audience to do with as they will. This year the festivities were more efficiently organized than usual, the only shortcoming being the lack of sufficient pauses between events.

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Jan 07, 2005 0 comments

<B>Thomas J. Norton</B><BR>
Time was when CES meant small, unexciting televisions lining the back isles of the convention center. Those times are well past, as manufacturers both large and small vie for the sexiest video presentation. The winner this year was clearly Samsung, with their 102-inch plasma (as before, all screen sizes here are diagonal unless stated otherwise). How they got this monster to Las Vegas and into the convention center free of damage and fully functional remains one of the seven mysteries of the show (another was who distributed all of those pornographic calling cards around the men's restrooms&mdash;but let's not go there).

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Jan 06, 2005 0 comments

Maybe the economy is really taking off. Or maybe it's simply that the cancellation of the big fall compute show, COMDEX, has sent all the computer types scurrying off to CES, but this year the show seems incredibly crowded. The isles were blocked, the press room didn't have a seat to spare (in contrast to the press room at CEDIA, where you could play catch most afternoons without bothering anyone), and the traffic and parking made LA&mdash;at least on a slow day&mdash;look like Barstow.

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