LATEST ADDITIONS

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John Sciacca Posted: Aug 04, 2003 0 comments

The quest for the perfect remote control has earned a place in the pantheon of noble but futile human endeavors alongside those for the Holy Grail or a fabulous "undiscovered" wine under $10. For some people, remotes are a necessary evil, creating clutter and increasing complexity until it seems you have to solve a puzzle like Rubik's Cube just to watch a movie or play a CD.

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Barry Willis Posted: Aug 03, 2003 0 comments

As of August 1, a premier trade association of hardware and software companies has a new name and a renewed mission.

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Posted: Aug 03, 2003 0 comments

Thomas J. Norton hopes you don't peek at the product's price before reading his reveiw of the expensive <A HREF="http://www.guidetohometheater.com/showarchives.cgi?139">Mark Levinson No. 40 preamplifier-processor</A>. But even if you do, TJN notes "there's real value in knowing what's possible at the very tip of the home theater pyramid."

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Posted: Aug 03, 2003 0 comments

One of the longest-running nightmares for home entertainment fans could one day come to an end, thanks to a new standard announced in late July by the Home Networking Committee of the <A HREF="http://www.ce.org">Consumer Electronics Association</A> (CEA).

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HT Staff Posted: Jul 31, 2003 0 comments
DVD: The Guru—Universal
Audio: 2
Video: 3
Extras: 2
Are there any excuses for a movie like this? The self-proclaimed romantic comedy The Guru doesn't elicit the faintest smile as it plods through a mediocre storyline that's studded with unentertaining musical sequences. We're forced to sit though the story of Ramu (Jimi Mistry), an Indian guy who dreams of a grand life in the United States buy instead gets stuck working in a restaurant once he arrives. In a desperate attempt at stardom, he takes a job on a porn flick and befriends his costar (Heather Graham), who gives him more than enough sage advice on love and sex. He then turns that advice into a career of his own—a fake sex guru for lonely rich women. Unfortunately, if there's anything entertaining here, I don't see it. They lost me when Ramu stripped to his underwear and did Tom Cruise's Risky Business number in Hindi.
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HT Staff Posted: Jul 31, 2003 0 comments
PSB
You know that a product is going to be good when the designer is also the company's founder. Such is the case with PSB's new Platinum Series, designed and developed by founder Paul S. Barton. The line includes seven new models: the T8 and T6 towers, M2 minimonitor, C4 and C2 center channels, S2 bipolar surround, and SubSonic 10 subwoofer. The PSB Platinum T8, the flagship tower, uses three 8-inch woofers, two 4.5-inch midrange drivers, and two 1-inch tweeters. The front tweeter faces forward, while the other tweeter is rear-firing. The midrange drivers and front tweeter are arranged in a D'Appolito array. According to the company, this arrangement produces a large horizontal and vertical sweet spot with outstanding clarity. The enclosure measures 10.5 by 46.5 by 16 inches and is available in black ash or cherry, with a die-cast aluminum base, top, and side extrusions. The T8 is available at a suggested retail price of $6,500 per pair.
PSB Speakers
(888) 772-0000
www.psbspeakers.com
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HT Staff Posted: Jul 30, 2003 0 comments
High-definition television got a big boost from two major sources in July.
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David Ranada Posted: Jul 29, 2003 0 comments

So there I was, in the middle of a crowded and hectic Times Square, right when all the Broadway shows let out, shooting all the bright lights and action with this ultra-brand-new $3,500 camcorder.

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Rich Warren Posted: Jul 28, 2003 0 comments

Photos by Tony Cordoza The Pioneer Elite ES-DV1000 will grab your eyes as much as the DVD movies it plays will. Its sophisticated electronics are hidden inside a beguilingly simple and elegant brushed-aluminum and gray cabinet.

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Michael Antonoff Posted: Jul 28, 2003 0 comments

Photos by Tony Cordoza Electronic program guides (EPGs) that help you choose what to watch from among hundreds of channels are built into a variety of devices from TV sets and set-top boxes to satellite receivers and hard-disk recorders. What they have in common is an onscreen display that, if it doesn't cover the TV picture, reduces the show to a small window.

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