Review: LG 47LW5600 3D LCD HDTV

TEST BENCH

Color temperature (ISF Expert 2 mode/Warm color temperature preset before/after calibration):

20-IRE: 6,817 K/6,431 K
30-IRE: 6,816 K/6,499 K
40-IRE: 6,819 K/6,548 K
50-IRE: 6,796 K/6,527 K
60-IRE: 6,720 K/6,515 K
70-IRE: 6,726 K/6,495 K
80-IRE: 6,685 K/6,492 K
90-IRE: 6,638 K/6,464 K
100-IRE: 6,572 K/6,405 K

Primary Color Point Accuracy vs. SMPTE HD Standard

Color

Target X

Measured X

Target Y

Measured Y

Red

0.64

0.65

0.33

0.34

Green

0.30

0.33

0.60

0.60

Blue

0.15

0.15

0.06

0.07

The LG 47LW5600’s Warm color temperature mode delivered the more accurate picture of its two presets, measuring within ±317 kelvins from 20 to 100 IRE. Performance improved to ±95 kelvins after grayscale calibration in the set’s ISF Expert 2 mode.

Color-decoder error via the set’s HDMI inputs measured –5% for both green and blue. Its primary color points matched the SMPTE HD standard pretty closely with the BT709 Color Gamut option selected, with green measuring slightly yellow-green. Gamma with the TV’s 2.2 Gamma setting selected averaged out to around 2.4. Brightness, measured from a 0-IRE (black) full-field pattern in the same mode, was 0.005 ftL. With Dynamic contrast switched off and High LED Local Dimming option selected, the set’s contrast ratio measured 7,386:1.

Overscan with 1080i/p signals was 0% with the Just Scan aspect ratio mode selected, while the 16:9 mode displayed 3% overscan. The set displayed full picture resolution for all signal formats delivered via both HDMI and component-video connections. Motion-resolution tests revealed 1,000-plus lines with TruMotion on, although this feature also added a “video effect” to film-based content at all settings, even in Custom mode with the judder reduction slider at its minimum setting.

The LG’s screen uniformity was mostly excellent, although a degree of spotlighting — uneven lighting of specific zones in the picture — could be seen in images where light objects traversed a dark background, especially in letterboxed movies. The set’s performance on viewing angle tests was excellent: Pictures retained uniform brightness and contrast even at a +90º viewing angle. The LG’s deinterlacing of both film- and video-sourced material was also excellent. The only test that it didn’t pass from the various Blu-ray tests discs I checked out was Chroma Multiburst from Spears & Munsil High-Definition Benchmark. Noise-reduction processing was very effective, with no picture-detail loss visible even with the Noise Reduction and MPEG Noise Reduction modes at their highest settings. — A.G.

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