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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 09, 2007 1 comments

I was impressed, and surprised, by the quality of the image that Meridian's iRIS produced on a modestly sized, flat panel screen. More than a simple iPOD dock, this $400 jewel upconverts the low rez image on a video iPod to 1080p, cleans it up in various ways, and outputs it to your HDTV. No, it's not high def, or even DVD-quality, but it was way better than VHS and more than watchable. Two other nearby screens also showed different program material (animation and TV-based) but they weren't as impressive as this one. If the color balance looks a bit whacked in the photo, it wasn't the demo, but rather my hurried attempts at color correction. The untouched, available light photo was badly skewed by the lighting in the convention center.

Tom Norton Posted: Sep 08, 2007 Published: Sep 09, 2007 2 comments

Aerial prez and designer Michael Kelly stands next to a version of his company's impressive System 1. it's shown here for the first time with a 2.35:1 screen, which may be flat or curved, masked or unmasked.

Tom Norton Posted: Sep 08, 2007 0 comments

THX is now getting into video product certification, and was running training sessions throughout the show. As yet few video products carry the THX imprimatur.

Tom Norton Posted: Sep 08, 2007 0 comments

SIM2's demo used three new projectors from that company. The first, and the one that impressed me most from a price/performance
aspect (though at $16,000 it isn't cheap by today's projector standards) was the HT-3000E. Incorporating TI's BrilliantColor technology, and SIM2's new Unishape lamp technology that can vary both the color of the lamp and its brightness in a dynamic, nearly instantaneous way, it presented a superb image with excellent deep blacks. Oddly, SIM2 was using a Firehawk screen-8' wide for the 3000E, 10' wide for the other two projectors, the C3X ($20,000) and the C3X 1080($30,000), both of which were demonstrated with anamorphic lenses. (There was a lot of anamorphia going around at this year's show.)

Tom Norton Posted: Sep 08, 2007 0 comments

At the 2006 CEDIA Stewart Filmscreen showed a new, frameless,self-supporting rear projection glass material, Starglas. The company has now come up with a wide assortment of possible applications. Here a glass panel is mounted in a shallow cabinet at the foot of a bed. When needed, it rises up to viewing height. The image is projected from the rear, perhaps, as here, from a projector mounted in a cabinet at the other side of the room (presumably, a bedroom of more than shoebox size!). Ta Da! A substitute for a large plasma. The glass in the Starglas panel, incidently, is safety glass.

Tom Norton Posted: Sep 08, 2007 1 comments

Take the Starglas material discussed in the last entry, make it 2" thick, and you can have your TV picture on the floor and even walk all over it.

Tom Norton Posted: Sep 08, 2007 0 comments

I could tell you that this is a better picture of the Samsung SP-A800 we reported on earlier in the show. But it isn't. It's the Samsung SP-A400, and apart from its smaller size, it's a dead ringer in appearance for the SP-A800. It's a 1280x768 design. Didn't catch the price yet, but it's sure to be lots cheaper than the circa $10,000 price of its big brother.

Tom Norton Posted: Sep 08, 2007 0 comments

Wilson Audio can produce their high end speakers in the color of your choice. I believe these colors are in the '50s Lawn Furniture line.

Tom Norton Posted: Sep 08, 2007 0 comments

The Velodyne SPL-800R isn't the smallest or newest Velodyne subwoofer, but it caught my eye since I'm in a hunt for small, manageable, high quality subs-as you might gather from a few of my entries hereabouts. It uses a 10" driver, is a bit over a foot all around, and will run you $$1249. The larger SPL-1000R to its left can be yours for for $$1649.

Tom Norton Posted: Sep 08, 2007 0 comments

Somebody broke open a JL Fathom f113 subwoofer and now everybody knows what's inside!

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