Tom Norton

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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 26, 2010 0 comments
Optoma has a new outboard 3D converter, which should be available in November. The projected price of this small, unassuming box is expected to be $399, and it is said to be compatible with any projector that can do 720p and 120Hz. The demo was not encouraging, but perhaps some fine tuning will line things up better.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 26, 2010 0 comments
Marantz showed a new version of its BD7004 Blu-ray player, the UD7005 ($900). The BD7004 was very highly rated in my Blu-ray player evaluation blogs for ultimateavmag.com, so naturally the company decided to change it! The new player includes a 32-bit audio DAC with high quality multichannel outputs, on-line video streaming, SACD and DVD-Audio playback, and full 3D capability out of the gate.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 26, 2010 1 comments
Schneider is one of the most respected names in anamorphic lenses for 2.35:1 projection. The newest edition to its extensive line is the Cine-Digitar Anamorphic CDA 1.33x EL, designed for small to medium sized projectors. When it becomes available later this year there will be a promotional price on a package combining this lens with a Kino-Torsion motorized deployment system (a motorized "sled," though Schneider's Kino-Torsion model operates more like a swinging door to move the lens in and out of the way as needed). The rep on hand stated the promotional price at $4500; I was not sure at first if this meant dealer cost (CEDIA is of course, a trade show) or MSRP to the consumer. He hesitantly said it's to the consumer, so we can all hope. For those in the know, this is not a high price for a first class anamorphic lens and motorized mechanism.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 26, 2010 0 comments
PSB's Paul Barton insists that his new CS100 Universal Speaker can go anywhere inside or outside, though at $499/pr we'd at least be inclined to put it under an outside eave or something to protect it from a severe drenching. And don't try to use it under water; it's not a below water pool speaker. Apart from such abuse, however, it could well be just the ticket for singing in the rain.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 26, 2010 0 comments
Mitsubishi's Diamond 3D prototype was being shown on an 107-inch wide, 2.1 gain Draper screen. Without the 3D glasses in place, the image was very bright. With them on, it was unacceptably dim. More work is still underway on this design (including the 3D glasses; Panasonic glasses were used in the demo). Photo courtesy of Scot Wilkinson of www.ultimateavmag.com.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 26, 2010 0 comments
NuVision was demonstrating its P2, LED-illuminated, 2D single-chip DLP projector on an 87" wide, Stewart Studiotek 130 screen. Using 0.95-inch DLP chip, or DMD, it was more than satisfyingly bright and punchy, though I did note what appeared to be a slightly too vivid color balance and (perhaps) minor gamma issues. $17,000. The anamorphic lens shown in the photo is an extra cost option, and was not used in the demo.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 26, 2010 0 comments
With a flourish that says Scandinavia, Runco has introduced Copenhagen Design, a new Danish-flavored style to be incorporated into a number of its new products. But as always, the important story for us was the tech, not the look, and Runco has obviously been busy in the lab this year.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 25, 2010 0 comments
The ripple effect was apparently the theme at this year's Sony booth.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 25, 2010 0 comments
Epson has become well known as a major producer of high quality, relatively affordable LCD projectors. Now, using its expertise as a premier imaging chip producer, it has produced an offshoot of LCOS, which differs in that it grows the active elements onto quartz rather than silicon. The result is a reflective LCD, or in Epson's words, RHTPS, for Reflective High Temperature Polysilicate.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 25, 2010 0 comments
Digital Projection offers so many models it's hard to keep them straight. They range in price from around $5000 to the sky's the limit, and include 3D designs, LED-lit models, and much more. The only common thread is that they are all DLPs, both single-chip and 3-chip. Most important, however, is the high quality we've consistently seen from them on the screen, both at shows such as this one and in our own in-house evaluations.

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